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Sent Wrapped SGB to Bitrue SGB address....?


ZerpTidalWave
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18 hours ago, ZerpTidalWave said:

My dumbass sent wrapped SGB to regular Bitrue SGB address two weeks ago..They act like they don't know what to do..Are they lost forever?

Yikes, that's prolly an edge case no one even thought of addressing in their customer support UI. 

AFAIK it would be logistically possible for Bitrue's support staff to track down the deposit, and send it back to the origin account. But I'd be shocked if their CS toolset includes this capability for the operators. 

And even more unlikely they'd task an engineer to add that UI option just for one unfortunate customer that miss-routed their test-net token. 

My sympathies for your blunder :-/ 

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10 minutes ago, BillyOckham said:

Um isn’t that just the same address?  It doesn’t differentiate between Wrapped or not does it?

So the UI mightn’t show it,  but it should be there shouldn’t it?

A helpdesk request should be able to resolve it shouldn’t they?  It didn’t go into an abyss.  

Yes it's the same address. Bitrue can retrieve it if they want to. It's a question of whether they want to or not. Some exchanges will (but it usually takes a while), some will if you pay a fee, and others won't because they don't want to be bothered.

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4 hours ago, JASCoder said:

Yikes, that's prolly an edge case no one even thought of addressing in their customer support UI. 

AFAIK it would be logistically possible for Bitrue's support staff to track down the deposit, and send it back to the origin account. But I'd be shocked if their CS toolset includes this capability for the operators. 

And even more unlikely they'd task an engineer to add that UI option just for one unfortunate customer that miss-routed their test-net token. 

My sympathies for your blunder :-/ 

Thank you all for the response.  ya my son was prepping for a surgery and I was in the waiting room messing with it.  My mind wasn't all there and therfore shouldn't have been fooling with it. 10k SGB..maybe I will bribe Bitrue lol. If they could just unwrap it would appear in my wallet.

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5 hours ago, JASCoder said:

Yikes, that's prolly an edge case no one even thought of addressing in their customer support UI. 

AFAIK it would be logistically possible for Bitrue's support staff to track down the deposit, and send it back to the origin account. But I'd be shocked if their CS toolset includes this capability for the operators. 

And even more unlikely they'd task an engineer to add that UI option just for one unfortunate customer that miss-routed their test-net token. 

My sympathies for your blunder :-/ 

I was waiting for him to say his kid made it through surgery okay, but I'll just assume that, I guess.  Did call himself a dumbass, so, I'll give him a pass. :)  These little edgecases are exactly why testnets are run, so, might as well do it - dunno what the scaling factor is or the sample size of participants, but probably not going to be an "edgecase", live.

"Great work, geniuses.  Now, build it all again with an interface for idiots, like me, who will henceforth be addressed, politely, as 'the customer' - and for newbie developers and for CS folks everywhere, who also will need an interface."

I give them major points for running the testnet.  Most super-techie types don't see it from the user-side/empathize.

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39 minutes ago, ZerpTidalWave said:

Yes my son will be fine. He tore ligament playing football. Anchored in 4 places..ouch. Thank you for your kindness..lol

Ouch, indeed.  I'm torn over whether or not to hit "like" on your response - sounds "fine" to you, but you won't feel it! :)

Something about the entire situation reminded me of this scene, while I was trying to figure out which button to push:

Remarkable how many times that scene comes to mind in tech-land.  (Glad that's not the case with this bird, anyway.)

Hope your kid's okay;  when you inevitably start fiddling w/your phone at his first follow-up, update us on the sgb... :)

 

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1 minute ago, jargoman said:

The issue is that the receiving end may use a hardware wallet. Many exchanges use bitgo which uses hardware wallet. You may be waiting a long time, potentially indefinitely 

But it’s an exchange….     they have hot wallets and the capacity to allocate funds/tokens even if they are not the same ‘tokens’ that were sent.

They can credit the users exchange account balance and if ever sent off the exchange the tokens would simply come from the hot wallet.

So it doesn’t appear technically or organisationally difficult to me, but perhaps I’m missing something. 

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7 hours ago, BillyOckham said:

But it’s an exchange….     they have hot wallets and the capacity to allocate funds/tokens even if they are not the same ‘tokens’ that were sent.

They can credit the users exchange account balance and if ever sent off the exchange the tokens would simply come from the hot wallet.

So it doesn’t appear technically or organisationally difficult to me, but perhaps I’m missing something. 

Yes they can do it. But they specifically set up their processes not to allow this. They're protecting their funds against their own employees as much as they are outside hackers. Exchanges typically have specific times when manual transactions can be performed. It can sometimes take months before they retrieve your coins for you.

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15 hours ago, NightJanitor said:

Something about the entire situation reminded me of this scene

"The Right Stuff" - great book, so much more meat than what made it into the movie, but both were good.

They also wanted SOMETHING to do as well, not to just be a "monkey in a can" situation.
IIRC the engineers put in some kind of control stick to effect some aspect of the descent.

There was one hair-raising scene after one of the splashdowns, where one of the men had egressed the floating capsule, in somewhat rough seas, and his suit was taking on water and was encumbering his ability to "dog paddle" to stay afloat, and he began to panic he'd be soon sinking and fast - waving his hand elicited only more waves and smiles by the recovery crews.

"Tragedy narrowly averted" 

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14 hours ago, BillyOckham said:

So it doesn’t appear technically or organisationally difficult to me, but perhaps I’m missing something

Typically at the enterprise level, the work flow to effecting changes to live production systems include many steps and people, and always incur some level of risk, and are decided by project managers based on cost vs benefit weighting.

For example:

  • Write up a change request ticket, which gets reviewed, assigned and prioritized
  • A dev branches the code base, and implements their changes
  • A push request is issued and reviewed by another dev
  • Dev-ops team merges dev branch and pushes release candidate branch into a staging environment 
  • A Q/A team is assigned to test changes in staging, and sign-off on its acceptance
  • Dev-ops merges RC branch into production branch and release manager pushes it live
  • Q/A team tests and signs off on completed changes

As you can see, little simple things can require some prohibitively onerous costs to perform.

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1 hour ago, JASCoder said:

As you can see, little simple things can require some prohibitively onerous costs to perform.

Not only can I see it,  I’ve lived it.  I know full well exactly what you refer to having worked in that environment for many decades. 


But I also have seen how it’s only a matter of a decision….   and then suddenly things can be done (if desired).


I stand by everything I said.  If they wanted to they could do it easily.

I don’t know where Brian gets his inside knowledge of exchange operations,  but I don’t believe it’s correct that something sent to the exchange at a public facing address is then in cold storage.

Just sayin, and I KNOW it to be true, that if they wanted to….    they could have it done in hours.  Of course,  a week or three is more normal and likely.

 

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2 hours ago, JASCoder said:

Typically at the enterprise level, the work flow to effecting changes to live production systems include many steps and people, and always incur some level of risk, and are decided by project managers based on cost vs benefit weighting.

For example:

  • Write up a change request ticket, which gets reviewed, assigned and prioritized
  • A dev branches the code base, and implements their changes
  • A push request is issued and reviewed by another dev
  • Dev-ops team merges dev branch and pushes release candidate branch into a staging environment 
  • A Q/A team is assigned to test changes in staging, and sign-off on its acceptance
  • Dev-ops merges RC branch into production branch and release manager pushes it live
  • Q/A team tests and signs off on completed changes

As you can see, little simple things can require some prohibitively onerous costs to perform.

Yeah, that's why I like the startup enviro more...  I was that guy who'd just edit the live site, live. :)  ("Oh, I can fix that.  *thinks a while*.  Fixes it, right, the first time, with second, third, nth order considerations factored in.)  But, yes, in more complex systems/organizations, the old Morrissey line kicks in "These things take time" - and empathy is much more of a two way street.  A little humor goes a long way, though, I will say.  And always good not to panic - on either side...

(Also something about carrying a towel?) :)

(On The Right Stuff - and all of this talk about bureaucracy, layers, tickets, and 19 people - to do something that ought to be simple - that reminds me of an old book about Kelly Johnson & Ben Rich at LMT - think it was called Skunkworks.  Lovely book.  Came back to the top of my piles, within the last year or two.  It holds up - and there are a lot of good lessons to be had from it. (Meta:  I suspect that it's probably out of print in English - that, or nobody bothers to read, anymore - but that the book's definitely been translated into Mandarin and well-studied...) :angry:

 

 

Edited by NightJanitor
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