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Autonomous Legal Applications Could be Coming to the XRPL


macropolo
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"these smart contracts would provide an unbiased interpretation of the law. Commercial smart contracts can then use existing compliance code to enforce legal behavior within their business activities."

I can see the benefits in theory. In reality this scares the every lov'in shite out of me. The law is not written by those who are non-biased nor have the best interests for the people within the country. I think if someone romanticizes with the idea of law or its enforcement as the great equalizer that takes society  to a peaceful end stands in a position that ignores history where the law itself is a determining factor for the genocide of millions. IDK. Like A.I. in time it will go very, very wrong when someone figures out how to game it.

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1 hour ago, ScottChamberlain said:

AMA...

Oh man, I have tons of questions about this stuff. I'm very curious about the concept of "code as law" in the text from Primavera De Filippi and Aaron Wright. One of the scenarios I thought was interesting was a hacker breaking the code of a legal smart contract and extracting money from it. If the flaw is within the code and the code is ostensibly the law, has he actually done anything illegal?  

I'm also curious about how far away the first iterations of these state-backed legal contracts are.

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Right, so the problem I'm trying to solve is that laws made of "pen paper people" - where enough of the right people change their behaviour based upon a shared understanding of words on a page - are flexible but not scalable. They generate rights, but not outcomes. I don't share the view of "code as law", but I do hope we can make "law as code". That is, laws don't come in just text, but potentially as smart contracts that let you automate outcomes. 

When we talk of "the law" its important to understand the law is not monolithic. Criminal laws are highly unlikely/unsuitable for automation. But managing commercial/personal civil relationships absolutely should be something I can choose to automate. So too, civil disputes.

When we talk of automation we are not talking about 100% automation. You want a platform that automates the 80% of things that can be automated and has off-ramps for the things that cannot. Take Ebay. It is a global platform for buying and selling good of low value. It only works because in addition to standardised terms and conditions it has a low cost automated dispute resolution mechanism (60million+ disputes handled in 2014) and insurance against fraud. The platform doesn't work without those two other things. If you had to rely on your local court every time you were unhappy with a chinese supplier the system would collapse for want of trust. 

Now imagine, Ebay without ebay in the middle. Ebay is replaced by a smart contract. And now imagine I can do that for any retailer in my country... I would have a system that could significantly reinvent/simplify consumer laws because I'm addressing the central power imbalance between retailers and consumers.

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Great points.

Maybe a better way to frame it, is to say, we are able to encode legal and regulatory *processes* to reduce inefficiencies, but not able to encode "the Law" (big 'L'!) itself, because it is subject to a sort of ever-changing societal/democratic consensus process. 

I think "crypto law" will sort of evolve into an overarching framework for how these rules are implemented logically (e.g. as standards) in smart programs and/or on-chain. 

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4 hours ago, thinlyspread said:

Great points.

Maybe a better way to frame it, is to say, we are able to encode legal and regulatory *processes* to reduce inefficiencies, but not able to encode "the Law" (big 'L'!) itself, because it is subject to a sort of ever-changing societal/democratic consensus process. 

I think "crypto law" will sort of evolve into an overarching framework for how these rules are implemented logically (e.g. as standards) in smart programs and/or on-chain. 

The CSIRO has a project data61 that is trying to do machine interpretation of written laws. I’m not sure that is the way to go

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5 hours ago, BillyOckham said:

All this sounds interesting and lovely but does anyone have a concrete example of how this would actually work? 

Not yet… BUT I see xrpl+hooks+evernode as the best chance to create such projects. Look at our ixrpl for example. It’s pretty sweet combination of tech.

Edited by ScottChamberlain
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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, ScottChamberlain said:

Now imagine, Ebay without ebay in the middle. Ebay is replaced by a smart contract. And now imagine I can do that for any retailer in my country... I would have a system that could significantly reinvent/simplify consumer laws because I'm addressing the central power imbalance between retailers and consumers.

Smart contracts as a direct to consumer interface between manufacturers and customers is a very interesting idea.  One of the things I love about the internet is that it's revitalized these peculiar cottage industries with places like etsy, ebay, etc.  

One of the big problems we have here in Canada is that some oligopolistic storefronts refuse to carry popular items and instead choose to sell products from manufacturers they have a formal business relationship with.  In a way, they have tremendous power in determining what it is we can buy.  A system that lets consumers and manufactures interact directly and bypass these oligopolies absent a formal gatekeeper has a ton of potential.

Edited by macropolo
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11 hours ago, ScottChamberlain said:

Not yet… BUT I see xrpl+hooks+evernode as the best chance to create such projects. Look at our ixrpl for example. It’s pretty sweet combination of tech.

Fair enough.  Thanks for replying.

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