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advise on phishing email


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Hello there,

I am a 2017 hodler, using nano ledger. 

A few days ago, i received a strange email from "ledger.com".  Email informs me that my ledger is disabled due to the new kyc regulations, ledger need personal data for verification. In the email is located an hyper link to google docs:o, wich i haven`t open. I am not able to check if the ledger is disabled because it is not located near me.

Can you advise me  what do you thnik about this email. If this is usefulf information, i am set up for the airdrop, by the wietse tut.

The things bodering me are:

-why i need kyc for ledger( may be i missed some news)

-the sender email is encrypted

-the link to google doc/ not to ledger web page itself

- the additional email adress this email is redirected.

i apply a screen shot with the email.

 

Screenshot_20201213-213945.jpg

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Today I received an email from (a fake) Bitstamp - addressed to me (including middle name) that only appear in my passport and isn't used online anywhere else as far as I am aware. Bitstamp always send me emails with my full name, but nobody else does. The email I received today is clearly a scam, but I'm troubled by the idea that Bitstamp (who I trust) have leaked some info - or been compromised in some way - I've never received bitstamp spam before. Anyone else getting emails from them like this?

image.png.9a6f6f605c4dd9a70f556ece0d55c591.png

Needless to say the link provided to verify your number is not a bitstamp one, but instead a long machine generated one that no doubt includes my info. (Note to others, don't click those links even if you are not planning on entering any personal info, because it lets them know that the message was received and clicked and may help them target you again in the future).

 

Edited by jbjnr
add note that email is not really from bitstamp, but from scammy fake bitstamp lookalike
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45 minutes ago, jbjnr said:

Today I received an email from (a fake) Bitstamp - addressed to me (including middle name) that only appear in my passport and isn't used online anywhere else as far as I am aware. Bitstamp always send me emails with my full name, but nobody else does. The email I received today is clearly a scam, but I'm troubled by the idea that Bitstamp (who I trust) have leaked some info - or been compromised in some way - I've never received bitstamp spam before. Anyone else getting emails from them like this?

image.png.9a6f6f605c4dd9a70f556ece0d55c591.png

Needless to say the link provided to verify your number is not a bitstamp one, but instead a long machine generated one that no doubt includes my info. (Note to others, don't click those links even if you are not planning on entering any personal info, because it lets them know that the message was received and clicked and may help them target you again in the future).

 

I got this one as well. Are you sure it is scam? Best phishing mail I've ever seen if that is the case. Same as you, they also used my middle name, and I rarely use it elsewhere.

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Best thing to do is go to their website and send out a "Contact Us" type message asking them about it.  

 

Do some research on their website for any updates...dont ever click on links in your email unless you know you were the one who initiated that email to be sent to you.

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21 minutes ago, captainjack said:

I got this one as well. Are you sure it is scam? Best phishing mail I've ever seen if that is the case. Same as you, they also used my middle name, and I rarely use it elsewhere.

I would bet my arse on it. The link under the "verify your phone number here" is a very long string of symbols with a domain https://u8137877.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/click?upn=[deleted identifying info] and is certainly not a bitstamp address. It was a well crafted email overall. 

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22 minutes ago, jbjnr said:

I would bet my arse on it. The link under the "verify your phone number here" is a very long string of symbols with a domain https://u8137877.ct.sendgrid.net/ls/click?upn=[deleted identifying info] and is certainly not a bitstamp address. It was a well crafted email overall. 

Yeah, I saw that, but still not certain it's phishing

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1 minute ago, captainjack said:

Yeah, I saw that, but still not certain it's phishing

You are their target audience then! <ker-ching sound of till ringing>Try logging into your bitstamp account, look under the news section, the security section, see if there are any notifications about enabling 2FA via SMS (they already have 2FA using google authenticate). If you see anything, activate it from your logged in account - not from the email link.

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5 hours ago, captainjack said:

Yeah, I saw that, but still not certain it's phishing

This is phishing. Got the same mail from "Bitstamp". Was not sure if my phone number was verified, so I used my browser to log in www.bitstamp.net direct. Checked my info and my phone number is verified. So they asking to verify my phone number that is already verified. This one is one of the best attempt I have ever seen.

Always remember to go direct into their site, if you are in doubt. Never click a link in an email, thats way to scary...

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1 minute ago, microdude said:

This is phishing. Got the same mail from "Bitstamp". Was not sure if my phone number was verified, so I used my browser to log in www.bitstamp.net direct. Checked my info and my phone number is verified. So they asking to verify my phone number that is already verified. This one is one of the best attempt I have ever seen.

Always remember to go direct into their site, if you are in doubt. Never click a link in an email, thats way to scary...

Fair play. I never click on links in mail unless it's reset password-stuff that I know triggered. However, I was never suspicious on this one. The "markets are heating up so get ready" was a particularly smart narrative because in 2017 all exchanges were overloaded so it would make sense for Bitstamp to do this (maybe they should?). Well done to you and @jbjnr though for being cautious and spotting it.

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4 minutes ago, captainjack said:

Fair play. I never click on links in mail unless it's reset password-stuff that I know triggered. However, I was never suspicious on this one. The "markets are heating up so get ready" was a particularly smart narrative because in 2017 all exchanges were overloaded so it would make sense for Bitstamp to do this (maybe they should?). Well done to you and @jbjnr though for being cautious and spotting it.

Better to be safe than sorry 🙂. Need to have access to Bitstamp without loosing control, cause I need to cash out when it moons 😀.

Take care and watch out for each other!

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