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https://www.coindesk.com/digital-euro-alternative-cryptocurrency-ecb-christine-lagarde

XRP believers and haters:

Last month, in another speech, Lagarde said foreign providers had taken the lead on payments innovation due to the lack of integrated infrastructure in Europe, but a digital euro would allow the bloc to make up lost ground. - Good for XRP

She said then that a future digital euro might be used for retail payments and be "accessible to a wide audience." - Bad for XRP

Repo and lending are looking more and more like the play for XRP...

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1 hour ago, StirCrazy said:

Last month, in another speech, Lagarde said foreign providers had taken the lead on payments innovation due to the lack of integrated infrastructure in Europe, but a digital euro would allow the bloc to make up lost ground. - Good for XRP

I'm not seeing why this may be good for XRP?

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1 hour ago, Flintstone said:

I'm not seeing why this may be good for XRP?

If CBDC occurs, which is unlikely - the context is a foreign company leading in the front - that's Ripple. 

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24 minutes ago, StirCrazy said:

If CBDC occurs, which is unlikely - the context is a foreign company leading in the front - that's Ripple. 

This is the original source with better context: https://www.ecb.europa.eu/press/key/date/2020/html/ecb.sp200910~31e6ae9835.en.html

I've bolded the parts of what I think Lagarde refers to as a 'foreign provider'

Quote

Europe has fallen behind in this competition. The lack of payments integration in Europe means that foreign providers have taken the lead. This is not necessarily a concern, as long as foreign firms are accountable and subject to appropriate regulation and oversight, in accordance with the principle of same business, same risk, same regulation. But the evolving global context and rapid technological progress are changing the nature of the risks that we are exposed to.

We are seeing an increase in protectionist policies, as sanctions and even exclusion from payment systems in recent years have shown. This presents new risks of payment disruption – especially for jurisdictions that are overdependent on dominant system providers.

Europe had a taste of the potential risks in the summer of 2018: outages at international card providers left millions of Europeans temporarily unable to pay for goods and services.[5]

European payments are also being affected by technology firms driving the digital transformation of global payments. These firms’ well-established user networks give them a unique advantage in the payments industry. More than a quarter of the world’s population are active users of Facebook, which could give its Libra project a global footprint from the outset. And it is not unlikely that other large technology firms enter the playing field, too.

This has great potential to drive competition, improve payment solutions and support financial inclusion. But it could also magnify a host of issues, ranging from abuse of market power to ownership of critical data. It could also make it more difficult to combat illicit activities and ensure operational resilience.[6]

And more importantly – but so far unlikely – if the bulk of payments are made using digital wallets rather than bank deposits and are denominated in private digital currency with weak links to sovereign currency, monetary sovereignty could be weakened. In a digital world, consumers must have the possibility to pay with sovereign money.

In China, for example, within a decade payments have shifted from cash to mobile payments, which are controlled by two large private technology firms.[7]

The planned introduction of a public digital currency can be seen as a means of managing the risks of this digital transition, in order to maintain trust in payments.

 

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