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macropolo

Ripple - A Washington D.C. Blockchain Heavyweight

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I wrote an article about Ripple's most recent push towards educating and working with regulators in Washington D.C. and around the world.  As I'm a fan of both fintech and politics I find the intersection of politics and blockchain to be endlessly fascinating.  

https://coil.com/p/macropolo/Ripple-A-Washington-D-C-Blockchain-Heavyweight/ueDzPC5aC

Edited by macropolo

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I stopped reading when you poo-poo'd the "series of tubes" description of the internet as "technically unsophisticated" - because you could not be more wrong.  It's an apt metaphor for the underlying physics of the thing (and it was certainly politically sophisticated, for the time, as Stevens' rhetoric resonated - with lawmakers who knew oil).

Save your generational angst for the kids who write all of these "data is the new oil" thinkpieces...  I know I do. :)

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5 hours ago, NightJanitor said:

I stopped reading when you poo-poo'd the "series of tubes" description of the internet as "technically unsophisticated" - because you could not be more wrong.  It's an apt metaphor for the underlying physics of the thing (and it was certainly politically sophisticated, for the time, as Stevens' rhetoric resonated - with lawmakers who knew oil).

Save your generational angst for the kids who write all of these "data is the new oil" thinkpieces...  I know I do. :)

Have yourself a wonderful day.

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Lobbying should be Ripple's number one focus. They already have the best tech and a corporate structure that has bore them impressive fruit as far as business relationships. They have it down to an art. Buuuuuutttttt...none of that matters so long as the 900 pound gorilla of government could crush the industry overnight. And they just could do that. Politics has become so infantile and vindictive, the greater good or long term growth doesn't even figure into the equation anymore. More and more demagogues are simply looking for convenient scapegoats, and "tech bros" as they like to call them disparagingly, make an easy target to take attention away from the staggering failure of the government in every area it touches. They, and their constituents don't understand the technology, and it therefore, as with all new things, someone will try using it to whip up fear and distract from the real issues facing the country. And then, when they finally do understand it, many politicians will be horrified to discover that it reduces their power. This is untenable in their minds, as any technology that limits their power is seen as anathema to the "greater good" ie whatever half baked vision they have for us. This is not to say there are not a few forward thinking congress critters. Those are the ones Ripple should reach out to and build relationships with. I'm glad to see that they are taking it seriously and I hope it will pay regulatory dividends in the long run.

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1 hour ago, Montoya said:

Lobbying should be Ripple's number one focus. They already have the best tech and a corporate structure that has bore them impressive fruit as far as business relationships. They have it down to an art. Buuuuuutttttt...none of that matters so long as the 900 pound gorilla of government could crush the industry overnight. And they just could do that. Politics has become so infantile and vindictive, the greater good or long term growth doesn't even figure into the equation anymore. More and more demagogues are simply looking for convenient scapegoats, and "tech bros" as they like to call them disparagingly, make an easy target to take attention away from the staggering failure of the government in every area it touches. They, and their constituents don't understand the technology, and it therefore, as with all new things, someone will try using it to whip up fear and distract from the real issues facing the country. And then, when they finally do understand it, many politicians will be horrified to discover that it reduces their power. This is untenable in their minds, as any technology that limits their power is seen as anathema to the "greater good" ie whatever half baked vision they have for us. This is not to say there are not a few forward thinking congress critters. Those are the ones Ripple should reach out to and build relationships with. I'm glad to see that they are taking it seriously and I hope it will pay regulatory dividends in the long run.

I agree.  Lobbying is very important and I'm glad Ripple is focusing on making these legislative and judicial connections in major economies around the world.  I also think their push to educate lawmakers on the potential legal uses of blockchain tech is paramount because it will hopefully counter the reputation we have as being a medium only for illicit services.  The mechanisms of the state in the U.S. can seem dreadfully slow but it was made that way by design, and for good reason in my opinion.  This can lead to some frustrating feet dragging with certain legislative issues but I have faith that we'll get there in time.

Edited by macropolo

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6 hours ago, macropolo said:

Have yourself a wonderful day.

Hey, no need to "nice tie" me... :)

Just pointing out that, if you're a guy who likes greasing the wheels ("lubricity") btwn govt/regs and tech, you gotta learn the language of both fields - not just tech.  That's why I mentioned the "data is the new oil" thing...  Those kids (in tech) actually stole that phrase from an old guy who knew something about branding and now they use it (debating it endlessly) as a way to explain highly specialized technical concepts to regulators.

Ahwell, I guess if you want to be offended, that's your choice.  But it wasn't an insult - you said you enjoyed learning about how this stuff works --- and I took you at your word...

Merry Christmas, anyway.

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18 hours ago, Montoya said:

Lobbying should be Ripple's number one focus. They already have the best tech and a corporate structure that has bore them impressive fruit as far as business relationships. They have it down to an art. Buuuuuutttttt...none of that matters so long as the 900 pound gorilla of government could crush the industry overnight. And they just could do that. Politics has become so infantile and vindictive, the greater good or long term growth doesn't even figure into the equation anymore. More and more demagogues are simply looking for convenient scapegoats, and "tech bros" as they like to call them disparagingly, make an easy target to take attention away from the staggering failure of the government in every area it touches. They, and their constituents don't understand the technology, and it therefore, as with all new things, someone will try using it to whip up fear and distract from the real issues facing the country. And then, when they finally do understand it, many politicians will be horrified to discover that it reduces their power. This is untenable in their minds, as any technology that limits their power is seen as anathema to the "greater good" ie whatever half baked vision they have for us. This is not to say there are not a few forward thinking congress critters. Those are the ones Ripple should reach out to and build relationships with. I'm glad to see that they are taking it seriously and I hope it will pay regulatory dividends in the long run.

I suspect that the team @Rippleare being extremely patient with the US regulators and government before they shift to other more friendly parts of the world.  Should the US not get on board soon, there are plenty of other parts of the world ready and willing to do what it takes to take a leading role in the FINTECH world.

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On 10/31/2019 at 7:53 AM, NightJanitor said:

I stopped reading when you poo-poo'd the "series of tubes" description of the internet as "technically unsophisticated" - because you could not be more wrong.  It's an apt metaphor for the underlying physics of the thing (and it was certainly politically sophisticated, for the time, as Stevens' rhetoric resonated - with lawmakers who knew oil).

Save your generational angst for the kids who write all of these "data is the new oil" thinkpieces...  I know I do. :)

To be fair, aren't metaphors, by their very nature, "technically unsophisticated"? Isn't that their whole point? Seems like you are being a bit needlessly condescending here. I just can't figure out why. 

Edited by Montoya

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10 hours ago, Montoya said:

To be fair, aren't metaphors, by their very nature, "technically unsophisticated"? Isn't that their whole point? Seems like you are being a bit needlessly condescending here. I just can't figure out why. 

Ok, let me try to rephrase... because I'm not being condescending just to be condescending, sincerely:

The approach of "you just dont get it / you're old / you're out of touch / you don't understand the tech" is an incredibly clumsy approach to bridging two domains.

(And, on metaphors, no... the ability to select an apt metaphor or think analogically is practically key to high level meets low level understanding...  Have you ever heard the old saying:  "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication."  Because it's true.)

A lot of this comes down to idiot young people who are immature and short-term focused, because they're 12 years old and fresh out of college and greedy - I can't count the smug little ******** who have told me (even though I'm maybe on their side, if they weren't sociopaths) things like "your generation is just gonna have to die" or some formulation of that, with absolutely no self-awareness that they, too, will be older, one day (unless they keep saying **** like that, in which case, hey, maybe they won't be old one day)... :)

Know what I mean?  There's a disrespectful little vulgar punk youth vibe to tech - and that infects all kinds of things - and turns the mature people into natural enemies...  And if you don't think there's an element of "I brought you into this world ("I invented a lot of the technologies that allow you young whippersnappers to write 3 lines of high level code") and I can damn sure take you out of it ("and don't think I don't understand it all better than you")...

The impertinence of youth... that kind of thing.   It's an obstacle.  Let's avoid it.

Edited by NightJanitor
clarity, many angles

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4 hours ago, NightJanitor said:

Ok, let me try to rephrase... because I'm not being condescending just to be condescending, sincerely:

The approach of "you just dont get it / you're old / you're out of touch / you don't understand the tech" is an incredibly clumsy approach to bridging two domains.

(And, on metaphors, no... the ability to select an apt metaphor or think analogically is practically key to high level meets low level understanding...  Have you ever heard the old saying:  "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication."  Because it's true.)

A lot of this comes down to idiot young people who are immature and short-term focused, because they're 12 years old and fresh out of college and greedy - I can't count the smug little ******** who have told me (even though I'm maybe on their side, if they weren't sociopaths) things like "your generation is just gonna have to die" or some formulation of that, with absolutely no self-awareness that they, too, will be older, one day (unless they keep saying **** like that, in which case, hey, maybe they won't be old one day)... :)

Know what I mean?  There's a disrespectful little vulgar punk youth vibe to tech - and that infects all kinds of things - and turns the mature people into natural enemies...  And if you don't think there's an element of "I brought you into this world ("I invented a lot of the technologies that allow you young whippersnappers to write 3 lines of high level code") and I can damn sure take you out of it ("and don't think I don't understand it all better than you")...

The impertinence of youth... that kind of thing.   It's an obstacle.  Let's avoid it.

I didn't suggest that age had anything to do with tech aptitude.  I just thought it was a bad metaphor.  Mostly because if you have a tube bottleneck why not just build more tubes?

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1 hour ago, macropolo said:

Mostly because if you have a tube bottleneck why not just build more tubes?

In the “internet as tubes” metaphor if there is a tube bottleneck you either replace it with a bigger tube or add more tubes in parallel or tubes to bypass.  Which is exactly what you do with a network layer.  So your question kind of supposes that the analogy falls down but I don’t think it does.

The places that the tubes analogy falls down on is packetisation.  And routing and addressing.  But that’s all diving in too far for the tube high level analogy.

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27 minutes ago, Tinyaccount said:

In the “internet as tubes” metaphor if there is a tube bottleneck you either replace it with a bigger tube or add more tubes in parallel or tubes to bypass.  Which is exactly what you do with a network layer.  So your question kind of supposes that the analogy falls down but I don’t think it does.

The places that the tubes analogy falls down on is packetisation.  And routing and addressing.  But that’s all diving in too far for the tube high level analogy.

From what I remember of the Senator's statement, he suggested that his data was getting stuck in the series of tubes because of streaming video and other bandwidth intensive activities.  And he used this analogy to criticize an amendment to a bill that would have forced companies like Comcast to treat traffic with neutrality.  So that response by me above is given in that context, by which I mean if the series of tubes has become that congested, instead of charging users more for certain types of data, why not build more tubes?

 

Edited by macropolo

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13 minutes ago, macropolo said:

So that response by me above is given in that context, by which I mean if the series of tubes has become that congested, instead of charging users more for certain types of data, why not build more tubes?

Fair enough...  I think the metaphor breaks down if we examine it too closely...  and my response to you was just a pedant being his naturally pedantic self,  and getting too far into the weeds.  Sorry if I derailed the conversation.  My apologies.

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