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New Video Explaining Xrp as a Scam

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2 minutes ago, Haydentiff said:

The answer, I think, is that if a cable broke the drop off would be such that the clique couldn't reach consensus so they'd not advance to the next ledger.

Right, if a "cable" broke and all validators on the east coast were still running on their servers then they would only see validations from their own server or other servers on the east coast if still connected, since they are disconnected from everyone else. The bigger problem for all these entities would be getting back on the internet, connectivity with the rest of the world, second they resume operation with their business and validator.

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Guest Haydentiff

Bitcoin and the Blockchain are mysterious things to the outside world. If I were Ripple's competitor, I'd be paying Peter Todd to speak all over place, telling bankers and corporate treasurers exactly what a Bitcoin CORE DEVELOPER thinks about Ripple. For the uninitiated, Peter's words will carry weight. Ignoring this is a bad idea, IMO. 

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While these clowns make uninformed videos in mom's basement, the professionals at Ripple, the entire Ethereum ecosystem, Factom, Hyperleder, etc. are busy applying this great technological advancement to real world use cases and building the infrastructure to the internet of value.  

Peter Todd, and his fellow bitcoin maximslists, only matter to their lemming groupies.

I'm just sorry that the talent at Ripple has to waste their personal resources repeatedly correcting these trolls.

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Guest Haydentiff
33 minutes ago, Phintech said:

While these clowns make uninformed videos in mom's basement

Peter presented his paper in front of bankers along with Jo Lang from R3.

Declaring yourself "above" responding to the criticisms of a Bitcoin core developer is insulting to the Bitcoin community.  I know many on this board view us (Bitcoiners) as low-lives, but if Bitcoin hadn't been conceived neither would Ripple.

The view from the high road is much better.

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3 minutes ago, Haydentiff said:

Peter presented his paper in front of bankers along with Jo Lang from R3.

Declaring yourself "above" responding to the criticisms of a Bitcoin core developer is insulting to the Bitcoin community.  I know many on this board view us (Bitcoiners) as low-lives, but if Bitcoin hadn't been conceived neither would Ripple.

The view from the high road is much better.

I appreciate the technology very much.  I have zero respect for the Bitcoin or nothing mantra that many of them subsribe to and evangelize.

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Guest Haydentiff
3 minutes ago, Phintech said:

  I have zero respect for the Bitcoin or nothing mantra that many of them subsribe to and evangelize.

It's not anymore attractive watching Ripplers do the exact same thing.

Please tell me how secret keys from the default UNL validators are protected?

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1 minute ago, Haydentiff said:

It's not anymore attractive watching Ripplers do the exact same thing.

Please tell me how secret keys from the default UNL validators are protected?

I'm very far from being a Ripple maximalist or evangelist.  I follow and support many projects.  

This is a very positive community that doesn't need to seek and attempt to destroy simply because it's failing from within.

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Guest Haydentiff
6 minutes ago, Phintech said:

that doesn't need to seek and attempt to destroy simply because it's failing from within.

I have no idea what this means.

But you didn't answer my question. How are secret keys from the default UNL validators protected?

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27 minutes ago, Haydentiff said:

I have no idea what this means.

But you didn't answer my question. How are secret keys from the default UNL validators protected?

Yes I saw your question.  I'll leave that to the experts to answer.  I don't need to pretend to understand everything about the technology to decipher the motives.

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Over the years I have had alot of respect for Peter Todd's accomplishments. Regarding his message here, it may be genius (or not) but it is very difficult to take them seriously in their girlie tee shirts sitting in what looks like a basement like a couple of high school kids making a class project video.  The medium he chose here shows a certain lack of professionalism that such an important subject requires. As the adage goes, "the medium is the message."

Nonetheless, I agree with Haydentiff that the criticisms he makes need to be officially addressed outside of xrpchat and I think it should done directly with him. Or better yet, why not hire him? He would be an asset to Ripple if he had a hand in addressing his own concerns.

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Five reasons I only watched a few minutes of this video:

1. The words scam and Ripple mean our foundation is biased

2. By the presenter's own admission he knows very little about Ripple and should not be taken seriously.

3.  97 minutes? Really?

4. Seriously painful production quality/delivery

5. Did I mention it is 97 minutes long?

Thank you @karlos for the summary and thank you @nikb and @JoelKatz for your comments. Always appreciated. 

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2 hours ago, Haydentiff said:

But you didn't answer my question. How are secret keys from the default UNL validators protected?

I can't go into any detail about the security measures Ripple has in place in production, but I will say that the machines and the sensitive cryptographic material they contain are well-protected.

Now, let me do the next best things and tell you how I protect the keys to my own validators:

  1. My validator machines are in a secure facility and are physically located inside an alarmed, tamper-evident enclosure, that is, itself, located inside a cage.
  2. They are both running a hardened operating system and using full disk encryption on all disks. A password is required to unlock the disk and boot the machines.
  3. The  machine's TPM is used to measure the boot sequence, ensuring that the BIOS, bootloader and kernel are not tampered with.
  4. The validators run as processes inside a VM guest running a minimal version of Linux.
  5. No incoming connections are allowed on those VMs.
  6. A separate firewall device (configured as a transparent bridge) sits between the machine and the Internet, as additional protection.

Note validator manifest support is going to be a big plus: it will allow validator operators to easily and seamlessly rotate validator keys on a regular basis without disrupting the network or requiring those who trust the validator to make any change.

 

 

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