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Epic Pennant on BTC Chart

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1 hour ago, rippledude said:

A lot of people on the vet forums say vet can do what xrp did.  Then when you bring up all the good news about xrp and the potential it has you get a lot of push back. Many  people cannot see more than one coin going up and becoming useful. I see great potential for many and look forward to a coin's intrinsic value reflecting on its price.  Vet has mojo right now.  

Good to hear there’s people on the VET forums saying that VET can do what XRP has done. I’m of that opinion. Agreed that many have a hard time understanding that a few coins can excel while not impeding the success of another.

I’m bullish on both XRP and VET for the same reason: I believe they’ll both appreciate much higher once their utility and performance becomes proven, accepted and appreciated. We aren’t there yet but I think we’re closing in for both. And when I say closing in I’m saying definitively by 2025. That may sound horribly far to some and I can appreciate that perspective. I’m cautiously optimistic I guess.

As far as actual push back that’s because some people are just plain tribal.  Some may actually want only “theirs” to succeed and others to fail solely simply for feelings of superiority. 

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@dr_ed , it was you that opened my eyes to VET, thank you ! It took a couple of looks before things lined up with my investment criteria but I finally got there. VET is a longer term play similar to XRP. I was the same way with HYDRO and that is up over 50% in recent days ! Now just need to time the tops so I can increase my stash on the retraces :D

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Baka said:

So VET is a good bet ? I see many people here talking about it , ATH was 9.44$ , damn.

No, that 9.44 was when it was an ERC 20. It has been diluted 100X, fwiw.  I believe that to be correct.

I like VET, and have made no secret of it.

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So VET is involved with Walmart, China. Thing is, spent most of the last decade there and f**k all Chinese people actually use Walmart. Can't recall seeing a single one in Shanghai either. It seems like more of a big deal to American's when they think 'omg Walmart China is using VET'. 

Not trying to be a downer, I haven't researched VET much. Big names like Tesco have tried to tap into China, and all are a fail. Even Amazon. It's all about jd (dot) com. Even Tesco became a butchered version of what it should be (picture live crabs running around on the floor, and no cheese for sale). From what I know of chinese culture Walmart can't ever be big theref government wouldn't want/allow it to either. Feel free to say otherwise. I'm not that bothered just chipping in with my personal experience. 

If jd (dot) com was using VET, I'd be all in. China doesn't want competition from western companies. They want their own home-grown version. That's why Youtube and much of Google is frequently blocked there.. not because of the Dalai Lama (official reason), but so their own companies can fill that space (think baidu). It's not a communist country despite popular belief, it's actually almost fascist in its capitalism (way more capitalist than most countries in Europe). And Chinese people tend to think that they can't lose on investments (because the government will bail them out). It can lead to disaster and has in the past... but as far as Walmart China... it's a nothing burger. If VET penetrates properly into China, however, you'd be a fool not to invest because there's just so many Chinese who will invest too.

I'll end this essay with a fact most of you won't know about China, and it says something about their psychology. Red in the markets means up, money, success. Green means down. So when you see a photo in the news of the Shanghai stock exchange and the board is all red, those Chinese are celebrating. 

Edited by baobeiiiii

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@baobeiiiii Walmart initially got some price movement, what’s really really gotten investors excited is the Chinese government officially support vechain. It’s being used to track exports between China and the EU. Countless other brands major brands are on boarded or in the process. Potentially vaccine tracking.  
 

there are literally too many deals to list that validate vechains ecosystem. It’s way bigger than Walmart 

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2 hours ago, MaxMad said:

@baobeiiiii Walmart initially got some price movement, what’s really really gotten investors excited is the Chinese government officially support vechain. It’s being used to track exports between China and the EU. Countless other brands major brands are on boarded or in the process. Potentially vaccine tracking.  
 

there are literally too many deals to list that validate vechains ecosystem. It’s way bigger than Walmart 

I haven't researched it as I said. I'll look into it. 

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It's funny how everyone, today, considers China to be a gold mine. I was once interviewed/interrogated by Europol police... in '09, them thinking I had a sham relationship with a Chinese woman over a visa (we ended up living in China together for many years after... but it was very uncomfortable and awkward to have to prove to police that your relationship is real.)

Back then everyone had a different opinion about China; "those Chinese are coming to Europe for passports and visas!" That was in Holland. 

Right now smart crypto money says anything to do with China is gold. There's a huge housing bubble in the making over there. In Shanghai, most of the property was bought up by people living in a place called Jiangsu. They literally bought up the entire city.  The price of property for rent or to buy in Shanghai is more than NYC. But no-one sells, and every person takes a loan to buy a second home. It doesn't help that Chinese will not buy second hand (that includes housing). They won't even rent out new homes; they buy them with an expectation that they can sell them down the line. What you end up with is entire towers left empty to decay. Millions of people are taking loans to buy property which often ends up empty. They are government subsidized too. 

Eventually that house of cards will fall, and you won't want to be invested in China when it happens. It is scary how big that bubble is. It has the potential to bring down the world economy. I'm not sure if I want to be invested in a crypto that is part of that.

I'm not slating China; I love the culture, I only speak English and Mandarin. Do some research into the economy over there, housing in particular, and you will need a shot of whisky. 

There are ghost cities over there. Entire cities. I've visited one on the outskirts of Shanghai. It was built to look like a town from Spain. Fake stores (bakery, dental office... just words written over a grey skeleton of dust and concrete), random creepy sculptures, empty. With my brother at my side, in typical British style, we found the only open store in a city built for 50k people... to be a wine shop. We were their first ever customer. The owner had to ride away on a motorbike, to return 30 minutes later with a bottle opener so we could drink it. And on the pi** we explored a megalithic ghost city... we really could have been in spain... and that is but one of hundreds of ghost cities. Most are bigger. They aren't built for human habitation; they are built because the companies that build them get government money to make them. 

The point being, the Chinese economy is a jenga tower. If I was stilling living there, I wouldn't dare have made this post. Because it's illegal and they will knock on your door. The government there is in a pickle because to maintain control they have to let everyone prosper. But it's all fcu*ked. Completely unsustainable. I even made friends with real estate agents (a dime a dozen on the streets) and went karaoke with them. They only sell new places; they actually move further and further out from the city into new developments just to be 'where the action is'.

Biggest bubble in human history.

Adding a personal touch to the rant, my partner's mother was the Minister for Education for all of Shanghai. She, along with a few colleagues, would make the infamous 'black day' exams which decide peoples' future (if you fail this exam, no uni for you). They would shut down entire roads so that students wouldn't hear noise during that exam.

I became part of it, helping to formulate questions for the exam, something which no westerner has ever done... helping with the structure and logic of the questions. I had truly completely assimilated into the culture; they considered me to be not just Chinese, but Shanghai-nese.  I had a crisis of conscience, because I used to be one of the students (but in the UK) who cared about exams. But there in China, that exam is life or death, and many people die/suicide over it. 

I asked her what she thought about the economic situation in China and the socio-economic system, and she was defensive, defending Mao and even asking me to help pick out a new home purchase that me and her daughter could live in once married. At that point, I thought 'I know the exam Q's, it's worth millions'. It was tempting, having been in a culture where money is the only thing that matters, and guanxi, I left shortly afterwards. I wasn't comfortable. These people don't seem to understand how messed up the system is. It's a capitalist economy with a bit of favoritism thrown in. We call it corruption in the West. Over there it is called guanxi, and I started to get 'drunk' on it as I had a powerful mother-in-law.  

Even the smart people over there, are part of the problem. I was forced to pose in-front of a huge statue of Mao at East China Normal University many times. I would speak to the older uni teachers and tell them how f*d up Mao was, and they would begrudgingly agree with me.  That was 2012.

Bubble will break. Pray that it doesn't bring down the entire world economy. Basing your investment success on what is popular in China is a dangerous game. The highest echelons of the government just look out for their family, below that you have ministers, police, all looking out for each other. The housing issue is huge and it has to break, the government can't afford to prop it up forever. I could go on forever, I have a real insight. Police stations protecting 'massage bars', always 100 meters from a police HQ. The fish rots head down. 

Edited by baobeiiiii

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8 hours ago, baobeiiiii said:

It's funny how everyone, today, considers China to be a gold mine. I was once interviewed/interrogated by Europol police... in '09, them thinking I had a sham relationship with a Chinese woman over a visa (we ended up living in China together for many years after... but it was very uncomfortable and awkward to have to prove to police that your relationship is real.)

Back then everyone had a different opinion about China; "those Chinese are coming to Europe for passports and visas!" That was in Holland. 

Right now smart crypto money says anything to do with China is gold. There's a huge housing bubble in the making over there. In Shanghai, most of the property was bought up by people living in a place called Jiangsu. They literally bought up the entire city.  The price of property for rent or to buy in Shanghai is more than NYC. But no-one sells, and every person takes a loan to buy a second home. It doesn't help that Chinese will not buy second hand (that includes housing). They won't even rent out new homes; they buy them with an expectation that they can sell them down the line. What you end up with is entire towers left empty to decay. Millions of people are taking loans to buy property which often ends up empty. They are government subsidized too. 

Eventually that house of cards will fall, and you won't want to be invested in China when it happens. It is scary how big that bubble is. It has the potential to bring down the world economy. I'm not sure if I want to be invested in a crypto that is part of that.

I'm not slating China; I love the culture, I only speak English and Mandarin. Do some research into the economy over there, housing in particular, and you will need a shot of whisky. 

There are ghost cities over there. Entire cities. I've visited one on the outskirts of Shanghai. It was built to look like a town from Spain. Fake stores (bakery, dental office... just words written over a grey skeleton of dust and concrete), random creepy sculptures, empty. With my brother at my side, in typical British style, we found the only open store in a city built for 50k people... to be a wine shop. We were their first ever customer. The owner had to ride away on a motorbike, to return 30 minutes later with a bottle opener so we could drink it. And on the pi** we explored a megalithic ghost city... we really could have been in spain... and that is but one of hundreds of ghost cities. Most are bigger. They aren't built for human habitation; they are built because the companies that build them get government money to make them. 

The point being, the Chinese economy is a jenga tower. If I was stilling living there, I wouldn't dare have made this post. Because it's illegal and they will knock on your door. The government there is in a pickle because to maintain control they have to let everyone prosper. But it's all fcu*ked. Completely unsustainable. I even made friends with real estate agents (a dime a dozen on the streets) and went karaoke with them. They only sell new places; they actually move further and further out from the city into new developments just to be 'where the action is'.

Biggest bubble in human history.

Adding a personal touch to the rant, my partner's mother was the Minister for Education for all of Shanghai. She, along with a few colleagues, would make the infamous 'black day' exams which decide peoples' future (if you fail this exam, no uni for you). They would shut down entire roads so that students wouldn't hear noise during that exam.

I became part of it, helping to formulate questions for the exam, something which no westerner has ever done... helping with the structure and logic of the questions. I had truly completely assimilated into the culture; they considered me to be not just Chinese, but Shanghai-nese.  I had a crisis of conscience, because I used to be one of the students (but in the UK) who cared about exams. But there in China, that exam is life or death, and many people die/suicide over it. 

I asked her what she thought about the economic situation in China and the socio-economic system, and she was defensive, defending Mao and even asking me to help pick out a new home purchase that me and her daughter could live in once married. At that point, I thought 'I know the exam Q's, it's worth millions'. It was tempting, having been in a culture where money is the only thing that matters, and guanxi, I left shortly afterwards. I wasn't comfortable. These people don't seem to understand how messed up the system is. It's a capitalist economy with a bit of favoritism thrown in. We call it corruption in the West. Over there it is called guanxi, and I started to get 'drunk' on it as I had a powerful mother-in-law.  

Even the smart people over there, are part of the problem. I was forced to pose in-front of a huge statue of Mao at East China Normal University many times. I would speak to the older uni teachers and tell them how f*d up Mao was, and they would begrudgingly agree with me.  That was 2012.

Bubble will break. Pray that it doesn't bring down the entire world economy. Basing your investment success on what is popular in China is a dangerous game. The highest echelons of the government just look out for their family, below that you have ministers, police, all looking out for each other. The housing issue is huge and it has to break, the government can't afford to prop it up forever. I could go on forever, I have a real insight. Police stations protecting 'massage bars', always 100 meters from a police HQ. The fish rots head down. 

Very interesting story.  I remember being told In the early 1980's Tokyo real estate was worth more than all the property in the US, then the bubble burst and Japan's vibrant economy never recovered.

You are right, the Chinese bubble will burst, half their businesses are not even profitable.  The Euro will collapse and I have no idea what will happen to the dollar. Yes it is inevitable.  We live with unstable currencies in a politically unstable world.  People will get hurt, others will thrive, it is very  much up to the individual to enjoy their lives and make the best of their circumstances. Whatever your future, find what is good and embrace it.

Life is a gift.  Live it through other people. 

 

 

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16 hours ago, Molten said:

I am more bullish now than I have been in some time, mainly because no one else shares my view currently.  It was the same when the S&P bottomed out in 2008/2009.  It was the same after the dot com bust.  It was the same after the Tulip Bulb bub.... wait, forget that last one :)

Where is the S&P 500 top and is it better to just ride it out or reallocate somewhere else?

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28 minutes ago, Julian_Williams said:

Very interesting story.  I remember being told In the early 1980's Tokyo real estate was worth more than all the property in the US, then the bubble burst and Japan's vibrant economy never recovered.

You are right, the Chinese bubble will burst, half their businesses are not even profitable.  The Euro will collapse and I have no idea what will happen to the dollar. Yes it is inevitable.  We live with unstable currencies in a politically unstable world.  People will get hurt, others will thrive, it is very  much up to the individual to enjoy their lives and make the best of their circumstances. Whatever your future, find what is good and embrace it.

Life is a gift.  Live it through other people. 

 

 

I love this post. It’s amazing how life gets complicated when you lay money, economics, and politics on top of it.

I travel to many places and I often think how fortunate people are that live in less developed areas or how fortunate tribal communities are. 

I mean that with the utmost sincerity.

....and how fortunate they are to not have to watch crypto charts haha

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1 hour ago, Julian_Williams said:

Very interesting story.  I remember being told In the early 1980's Tokyo real estate was worth more than all the property in the US, then the bubble burst and Japan's vibrant economy never recovered.

You are right, the Chinese bubble will burst, half their businesses are not even profitable.  The Euro will collapse and I have no idea what will happen to the dollar. Yes it is inevitable.  We live with unstable currencies in a politically unstable world.  People will get hurt, others will thrive, it is very  much up to the individual to enjoy their lives and make the best of their circumstances. Whatever your future, find what is good and embrace it.

Life is a gift.  Live it through other people. 

 

 

Sounds like a good argument to HODL bitcoin.

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48 minutes ago, ManBearPig said:

Where is the S&P 500 top and is it better to just ride it out or reallocate somewhere else?

I actually just opened a small short position on the S&P because it has extended into severely overbought territory.  The vast majority of my portfolio is still allocated in stocks and bonds, so this was just more of a "for fun" move because the technicals seemed pretty obvious.  My horizon is about 15-20 years off, so in the long run I don't really care much what happens right now.

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16 hours ago, baobeiiiii said:

So VET is involved with Walmart, China. Thing is, spent most of the last decade there and f**k all Chinese people actually use Walmart. Can't recall seeing a single one in Shanghai either. It seems like more of a big deal to American's when they think 'omg Walmart China is using VET'. 

Not trying to be a downer, I haven't researched VET much. Big names like Tesco have tried to tap into China, and all are a fail. Even Amazon. It's all about jd (dot) com. Even Tesco became a butchered version of what it should be (picture live crabs running around on the floor, and no cheese for sale). From what I know of chinese culture Walmart can't ever be big theref government wouldn't want/allow it to either. Feel free to say otherwise. I'm not that bothered just chipping in with my personal experience. 

If jd (dot) com was using VET, I'd be all in. China doesn't want competition from western companies. They want their own home-grown version. That's why Youtube and much of Google is frequently blocked there.. not because of the Dalai Lama (official reason), but so their own companies can fill that space (think baidu). It's not a communist country despite popular belief, it's actually almost fascist in its capitalism (way more capitalist than most countries in Europe). And Chinese people tend to think that they can't lose on investments (because the government will bail them out). It can lead to disaster and has in the past... but as far as Walmart China... it's a nothing burger. If VET penetrates properly into China, however, you'd be a fool not to invest because there's just so many Chinese who will invest too.

I'll end this essay with a fact most of you won't know about China, and it says something about their psychology. Red in the markets means up, money, success. Green means down. So when you see a photo in the news of the Shanghai stock exchange and the board is all red, those Chinese are celebrating. 

Not just China. Keep looking. There is much more to find. Walmart China is relatively old news, I am actually reducing my exposure to China at the moment. I sold a lot of TRX and a lot of KCS. If VET were as China-centric as those, I don't think it would be moving like it is. imho.

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5 hours ago, Julian_Williams said:

Very interesting story.  I remember being told In the early 1980's Tokyo real estate was worth more than all the property in the US, then the bubble burst and Japan's vibrant economy never recovered.

You are right, the Chinese bubble will burst, half their businesses are not even profitable.  The Euro will collapse and I have no idea what will happen to the dollar. Yes it is inevitable.  We live with unstable currencies in a politically unstable world.  People will get hurt, others will thrive, it is very  much up to the individual to enjoy their lives and make the best of their circumstances. Whatever your future, find what is good and embrace it.

Life is a gift.  Live it through other people. 

 

 

Pure gold, this.

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