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Ripple Network forked to create SystemD

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The minimum investment is 0.26 BTC :)  why BTC? :o 

Domain, Twitter and Github accounts are new. The only email leaves me a clue on who is behind it (danielw@vokez.io).

May be https://www.xrpchat.com/profile/1100-danielw/  @DanielW yes? nope? 

Domain ownership is hidden, the flashy website with BTC investment opportunity reminds me fraud ICOs I've seen before...

Not to offend anyone, just my opinion. Agree with @jn_r :

6 hours ago, jn_r said:

But besides that, I'm not sure the reason why they started the fork. Imo you should fork only if you disagree with the current status of a chain and can not come to consensus about the current way things are going. That would mean that they would have discussed their improvement points with Ripple and the community, and could not come to consensus, but I doubt that has happened

54889657_ScreenShot2019-01-12at21_57_07.thumb.png.262f83ee78d2dfa3b0073f4ff88c4844.png

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Hello Pablo,

Thank you for your reply and thank you for your questions. If there is any part of my answers that you do not understand, just let me know and I will try to explain again.

On 1/11/2019 at 7:44 AM, Pablo said:
  1. Who are the developers and business owners of Vokez? 

This is actually a two part question: who the developers, and who are the owners.

Vokez is a multinational group of developers and other talented people who have decided to create the security token platform called The State

We have been working on the idea and developing prototypes to test our design theories for over a year now.

We so strongly believe in the potential of security tokens, that we decided that we would use the The State as a tool for the organization, incorporation, and direction of Vokez the Company.

This brings us to the answer of the second part of your question, who are the owners of Vokez?

The owners of Vokez are the people who join Vokez by making a security token purchase, the founders of Vokez, the rest current Vokez team, and some future employees.

By using security tokens as a representation of ownership in Vokez, the ownership of Vokez will be divided in the following manner:

- 60% of ownership will be held by those who join Vokez via our STO (Security Token Offering)
- 20% of ownership will be divided by the founders of Vokez
- 10% of ownership will be divided amongst the rest of the member of the current Vokez team
- 10% of ownership will be designated to future employees of Vokez the Company.

They are the Owners.

 

On 1/11/2019 at 7:44 AM, Pablo said:
  1. You claim that The State is a security token platform that will empower companies, projects, and organizations with the ability to legally raise funds. In order to do so, you will have to be legally established yourself so can you please tell us (A) where your company is established, (B) which jurisdiction/s you are operating in, and (C) company numbers and registration details.
Quote

Our security token platform will allow issuers to select the jurisdiction in which they are operating and the local regulatory standard under which they would like to issue the security tokens. Based on their selections, our platform will present them with the ability to configure their security token, but only within the limits and guidelines of the local regulatory standard that they have selected.

For example, if an organization wanted to perform fundraising in accordance with a local standard which only allowed them to raise a maximum of 1 million, then our platform would only allow them to issue the tokens if the number of tokens multiplied by the price per token was under 1 million.

By using our security token platform, The State, anyone can issue security tokens in accordance with their local regulations and standards in order to legally raise funds.

So, as you can see, yes, our security token platform will empower companies, projects, and organizations with the ability to legally raise funds.

 

 

In order to understand the answer your questions (A), (B), and (C), you must first understand what a security token is, then you must understand how The State is different from most of the security tokens platforms out there.

I am sure that you already know that a "security" is defined by the 4-part “Howey Test”: it’s an investment of money, in a common enterprise, with an expectation of profits, solely based on the efforts of others. A "security token" in it's simplest form is basically a digital representation of a security as defined by the Howey Test.

So how does that translate into the fledgling world of crypto-currencies? Well we all know what a token is: it's digital and it can be transferred from one person to the other.

A security token is also a digital token also, but it has AML/KYC on the token itself. Each security token has it's own white-list of people who can legally receive a transfer of the token or posses the token. This is the standard implementation of a Security Token 1.0.

Our security token platform, The State, is a Security Token 2.0 platform. This means that not only does the platform allow for the issuance of tokens and granular control of who can possess the tokens, but it also contain 4 extra functions: voting, privacy, derivatives, and off-chain data access.

The function that concerns the answer to your questions (A), (B), and (C), is voting.

Our security token platform has voting built-in to the token. 

That means that as soon as our Security Token offering ends, these security tokens will begin to be used for establishing Vokez the Company.

All decisions, such as, where the company will be established, and what jurisdiction will it be operating in, and all major decisions about the direction of the company will be made by voting through the security tokens. 

All decisions will be made the Owners, and the Owners are the people who possess the Vokez security tokens.

 

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7 hours ago, jn_r said:

I disagree. Keeping history will allow verifying that the validators are not misbehaving.

There was a tweet thread on this subject where Nik also joined in. Not sure where best to start that thread, but this is one of those tweets: 

Key in this is that you need a previous ledger (read - history) to be able to calculate the next ledger

In rippled “previous ledger” and (collecting) full history are explicitly separate things. Of course you need the current state to determine the next state, but you do not need to know anything from before that state, and can consider them 100% agreed facts. That is why history is an optional feature on your rippled node, which most people that run a validator leave turned off.

The ledger history will not give any information about validators “misbehaving”, because the full ledger state has been fully agreed upon by all validators by definition. There is absolutely no way possible that you can look back at the history and conclude that some transaction in retrospect was not valid, because some misbehaving validator.

There is a constant discussion on twitter about this subject, and a lot of confusion is caused by the fact that it is difficult to understand what validators actually do: come to a consensus which valid transaction comes before anoter valid transaction. Transaction order is the only possible dispute, everything else is deterministic, which means there is only one possible answer to the question if a transaction is valid or not. And after the order has been agreed upon, that agreement is final, and no history of it is needed for the consensus process to move forward.

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4 minutes ago, lucky said:

In rippled “previous ledger” and (collecting) full history are explicitly separate things. Of course you need the current state to determine the next state, but you do not need to know anything from before that state, and can consider them 100% agreed facts. That is why history is an optional feature on your rippled node, which most people that run a validator leave turned off.

The ledger history will not give any information about validators “misbehaving”, because the full ledger state has been fully agreed upon by all validators by definition. There is absolutely no way possible that you can look back at the history and conclude that some transaction in retrospect was not valid, because some misbehaving validator.

There is a constant discussion on twitter about this subject, and a lot of confusion is caused by the fact that it is difficult to understand what validators actually do: come to a consensus which valid transaction comes before anoter valid transaction. Transaction order is the only possible dispute, everything else is deterministic, which means there is only one possible answer to the question if a transaction is valid or not. And after the order has been agreed upon, that agreement is final, and no history of it is needed for the consensus process to move forward.

I know this discussion has been before, let's not pick it up in this thread. happy to agree that we disagree for now :-)

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@Vokez, thanks to responding to our questions, could you please edit the title of this topic, or explain why you think “Ripple Network forked” is a correct summary of what has happened when you installed the XRP ledger, stopped it from listening to current validators, and posted a thread inviting others to trust validators exclusively under your control?

Trying to mislead investors may have legal repercussions.

Edited by lucky

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9 hours ago, Vokez said:

Vokez is a multinational group of developers and other talented people who have decided to create the security token platform called The State

Please name them and share their CVs. If they wish to remain anonymous, is there a reason why? I'll explain below why you will have to disclose this information if you are seeking investment in Vokez itself.

9 hours ago, Vokez said:

Vokez the Company.

Where is this company registered and what is the registration number please?

9 hours ago, Vokez said:

By using our security token platform, The State, anyone can issue security tokens in accordance with their local regulations and standards in order to legally raise funds.

Does the platform allow an issuing entity to create its own independent tokens and retain 100% of the funds raised from investors? Or is the issuing company only really selling the tokens it bought from Vokez? If it's the tokens that Vokez issued, the only party making money here is Vokez and the founders.

9 hours ago, Vokez said:

I am sure that you already know that a "security" is defined by the 4-part “Howey Test”:

Not in Australia or any other common law country. Sorry. The laws are very different in other parts of the world and the regulators have already decided how this works. They aren't waiting for the SEC.

There's a very high likelihood that you are operating an unlawful investment scheme by selling the Vokez security tokens without providing a detailed prospectus and other mandatory disclosures that would allow potential investors to fully understand the ownership of Vokez, its legal basis, business plan, target market etc that any other average investor in shares would receive. These disclosures would require you to explain who the founders, directors and operators of Vokez are.

Now, you might say: fine, I won't operate in Australia, UK, EU etc. That severely limits which markets you can sell the Vokez tokens and which exchanges can accept the tokens. Perhaps the token platform itself might have a market for fund-raising but it wouldn't be big.

9 hours ago, Vokez said:

Our security token platform has voting built-in to the token. 

Blockchain voting schemes are a nest of a snakes. They have been subject to a great deal of scrutiny because voting schemes can be readily gamed.

Can you please explain your voting scheme in detail? How are votes counted? Who is counting the votes? Are you using smart contracts (as in the DAO) or some other arrangement? What are we voting for and what voting topics are technically possible? Who presents the topics the subject of a vote? Where are the votes published?

For example, could I (as a large investor) vote to revoke the Vokez tokens of the founders and current members of Vokez (who only hold 30%)? If that is possible, then you might have an investor here... ;)

9 hours ago, Vokez said:

That means that as soon as our Security Token offering ends, these security tokens will begin to be used for establishing Vokez the Company.

Who receives the BTC I have used to buy your tokens? Is it distributed to all Vokez token holders or only the founders?

Sorry for all the questions. Do you have a white paper to explain these issues?

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11 hours ago, Vokez said:

That means that as soon as our Security Token offering ends, these security tokens will begin to be used for establishing Vokez the Company.

All decisions, such as, where the company will be established, and what jurisdiction will it be operating in, and all major decisions about the direction of the company will be made by voting through the security tokens. 

What you are trying to do is illegal.

For the record, s-east.vokez.io points to ipaddress 54.86.21.73, which is hosted by Amazon.

Amazon will pass your name and address to law enforcement when requested, together with a long list of other "fortune seekers". You are playing with fire. Anonymity on the Internet only goes so far. If you proceed with this, jail is closer than you think.

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21 hours ago, whiteout said:

How do we access our State wallets? By providing you our master and secret ripple keys?

no you could sign on offline transaction the same way you would on the rcl. 

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43 minutes ago, lucky said:

What you are trying to do is illegal.

For the record, s-east.vokez.io points to ipaddress 54.86.21.73, which is hosted by Amazon.

Amazon will pass your name and address to law enforcement when requested, together with a long list of other "fortune seekers". You are playing with fire. Anonymity on the Internet only goes so far. If you proceed with this, jail is closer than you think.

I can't connect to any of the URL's and the ip seems to be down. It's as though this never existed. You scared him so that in a matter of minutes he completely disappeared. But you still managed to post his ip

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1 hour ago, jargoman said:

I can't connect to any of the URL's

@jargoman Which URL and port?

We can take a look to see if there is an issue.

Edited by Vokez

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Why did you decide to take a snapshot of the existing XRP Ledger state if you are going to be using it to issue security tokens? The two logical approaches to doing what you are doing are:

1) Not fork anything, and just issue the STOs on the existing XRP Ledger

2) Create a completely new, fresh ledger with new genesis block.

I don't understand what the point is of keeping the existing XRP Ledger state if what you are doing has nothing to do with the existing ledger state. ie, why do you think it is important, for example, that Ripple own 60% of the tokens in your new endeavour?

-Matt

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