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The Final Phase of Desperation


JCCollins
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3 minutes ago, poothoot2 said:

Looks like there are connections to Ben Lawsky as well...

Yes indeed. The more interesting question at this point is...who isn't Ripple connected to? 

Anyone reading this who hasn't done too much research, check out the boards Chris Larsen sits on. That's a great starting place. 

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19 minutes ago, JCCollins said:

Thanks. There are many paths forward for sure.  A fascinating area of XRP research will be its impact on geopolitics.  

One of the things that is so great about XRP (and some other cryptos) is that if there are major geopolitical disruptions during this monetary transition people can at least have the possibility of preserving some of their wealth. For example, I imagine the people of Venezuela would have loved to be able to turn their money into XRP and then whatever currency they felt was stable during their government's route of their own currency. They could have turned it into the US dollar before immigrating to somewhere with a brighter future, then turn it to whatever the currency is where they immigrated. You can certainly memorize a number of passwords, but it'd be pretty tough to pack gold with you while fleeing under duress from a country in turmoil.   

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1 hour ago, XRPHornets said:

As a Brit,  I can say the dynamism, entrepreneurship, energy and creativity of the American people far far outweighs most continental Europeans .

The US government faces some serious  geo political and economic challenges and needs to address its global popularity issues , but it has a long way to go before it descends to the level of cultural and economic  lethargy that most European countries exist in. 

You are taking my comment out of it's original context...I'm also a bit surprised the author agreed with you to disagree with me on this one since my statement paves the way and backs his belief of going from a unipolar framework where King Dollar rules the roost to a multi currency multilateral global framework. One forum member asked about the USD depreciating going forward and I simply presented a fact (as of right now there are only 3 countries in Europe with higher debt levels than the US, they truly are in terrible shape). I do believe the dollar will stick around even if Debt - GDP levels go higher, but the fact remains, in the US we have the same problems as any other country (welfare, infrastructure, social security, health care, student loan debt) that demand large sums of money with a very divided government just as interest rates are coming out of a 30 year cycle and moving higher. If we do turn on the printing presses to pay back our debt, the original point of a depreciating dollar will be proven. Do not tell me we can't reach debt levels that push the limits. Trump was not supposed to be elected, Brexit was not supposed to occur, the Chicago Cubs were not supposed to win the World Series, and Rochdale was not supposed to tie Tottenham.     

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@JCCollins thanks a lot for your article and i do agree that this thread has become a proper brain teaser.

Having in mind your USD devaluation feeling what other fiat currency would you chose should you have to in order to diversify your portfolio? EUR or JPY maybe?

I won't take your answer as an investment advice and I always stick to DYOR approach.

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43 minutes ago, XRPonTheIronThrone said:

You are taking my comment out of it's original context...I'm also a bit surprised the author agreed with you to disagree with me on this one since my statement paves the way and backs his belief of going from a unipolar framework where King Dollar rules the roost to a multi currency multilateral global framework. One forum member asked about the USD depreciating going forward and I simply presented a fact (as of right now there are only 3 countries in Europe with higher debt levels than the US, they truly are in terrible shape). I do believe the dollar will stick around even if Debt - GDP levels go higher, but the fact remains, in the US we have the same problems as any other country (welfare, infrastructure, social security, health care, student loan debt) that demand large sums of money with a very divided government just as interest rates are coming out of a 30 year cycle and moving higher. If we do turn on the printing presses to pay back our debt, the original point of a depreciating dollar will be proven. Do not tell me we can't reach debt levels that push the limits. Trump was not supposed to be elected, Brexit was not supposed to occur, the Chicago Cubs were not supposed to win the World Series, and Rochdale was not supposed to tie Tottenham.     

No one attempted to offend you, my friend.  Your response is emotional and defensive.  I'll take responsibility for addressing your broader concern.  @XRPHornets was expressing his/her own opinion on the topic and it likely had little to do with the context (perceived or not) of your original comment.  My agreement with the comment was based on his/her context as opposed to your original context.  Neither of us is stating that things "can't reach debt levels that push the limits", we are only stating that the current movements and strategies would suggest things will move in the other direction.  Apologies if this wasn't clear on the front end.

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4 minutes ago, WillGetThere said:

@JCCollins thanks a lot for your article and i do agree that this thread has become a proper brain teaser.

Having in mind your USD devaluation feeling what other fiat currency would you chose should you have to in order to diversify your portfolio? EUR or JPY maybe?

I won't take your answer as an investment advice and I always stick to DYOR approach.

As a rule of thumb nations with trade deficits should see their currencies depreciate to facilitate an increase in exports, and nations with trade surpluses should see their currencies appreciate to facilitate a decrease in the exports. The idea is to have balance and not two extreme ends of the deficit and surplus spectrum.  As such, the Chinese yuan would see an appreciation of value once the USD exchange rate arrangement is ended.  But the advancement of crypto, and more specifically XRP, could throw these fundamentals out the window.  As time passes I lose interest in fiat currencies and the existing forex markets and my interest in cryptos grow.  Fiat currencies may appreciate and depreciate against one another for as long as they are around, but all fiat will depreciate against crypto (especially XRP) in the coming months and years.  With XRP being used as the bridge asset in global trade the surplus and deficit metrics will have to be measured somewhat differently. 

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@JCCollins thanks a lot again! I Don't want to look like a dump/blind follower but can't help asking: what are your # 2 and # 3 crypto bets are (provided XRP is the # 1)?

And what do you think is a better way of diversifying: into property or into gold if you must chose only one option? 

I have my own strategy i follow but i'm just curious to check it against what other smart people like you think...

Thank you again! :)

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55 minutes ago, WillGetThere said:

@JCCollins thanks a lot again! I Don't want to look like a dump/blind follower but can't help asking: what are your # 2 and # 3 crypto bets are (provided XRP is the # 1)?

And what do you think is a better way of diversifying: into property or into gold if you must chose only one option? 

I have my own strategy i follow but i'm just curious to check it against what other smart people like you think...

Thank you again! :)

Cryptos following XRP are Ethereum (of course, though I am concerned about the impact Codius will have on the value of ETH) and AGI from SingularityNET.  There's something about that one which keeps sticking with me.  Outside of XRP I think the other best ones haven't been developed yet.  

Commercial property which can produce an ROI is best.  Real estate (home) should never be used as an investment strategy.  Gold will be widely used in quantum computers which will likely do more to increase its value than any possible monetary functions.  The expansive nature of this quantum market is not even fathomed yet.  It will be massive. 

Outside of that, we are looking at companies which are building the markets around AI, robotics, especially artificial skin, eyes, organic circuitry, etc, and commodities.  The massive infrastructure development which will take place around the world in the coming years will use a lot of raw material.  A new commodities boom is on the way.

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4 hours ago, JCCollins said:

This has turned into an excellent thread.  Great conversation with facts.  This increases awareness and understanding for all of us. 

My thoughts exactly, as I was thinking about posting this same sentiment. As a "serious" xrp investor, so to speak, I read these boards daily, if not several times daily, looking to learn all that I can. Thank you for putting in the efforts to share your perspectives with those of us not knowledgable in these fields, but eager to learn.

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On 5/30/2018 at 11:01 AM, aavkk said:

For us here it would represent a fantastic set of circumstances but not without its challenges.  

Yup these are "problems" that I look forward to handling later on. But your overall thought on this is something I have been thinking about a lot as well. It will be very interesting to see how this whole thing goes down. 

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12 hours ago, DQA said:

Interesting times indeed, I am worried however for what is to come to the world.

I fear that Donald Jaywalker Trump is going to make the "beggar-thy-neighbour" trade wars brought on by Smoot-Hawley in 1930 make the Great Depression seem like a walk in the park. 

HODL on to your hats, folks, we're in for a bumpy ride.  As that great B movie actor, and co-star of Bedtime with Bonzo, once said: "You ain't seen nothin' yet."

Bedtime_for_Bonzo_1951.jpg

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