Jump to content

Irish Bread


CountZerpula
 Share

Recommended Posts

5aaf050e933ed_IrishBread.thumb.jpg.310548c6effcb2682174196ad664a031.jpg

Thanks for the warm welcome and invite @Snoopy

Can't wait to check out these recipes, and here is one of my own.

Nana’s Irish Bread

  1. 4 cups all-purpose flour
  2. 1 cup granulated sugar
  3. 1 tsp salt
  4. 4 tsp baking powder
  5. 1 tsp baking soda
  6. 2 tsp caraway seeds
  7. 4 oz. (1 stick) butter, melted (NOT hot)
  8. 2 cups buttermilk (room temperature)
  9. 1 egg (room temperature)

To be done ahead: Bring two cups water to a boil, then pour over raisins and set aside for about an hour.

Preheat oven to 350F, and grease or butter a #8 cast iron skillet (or bread pan, but skillet is best!)

Drain raisins and gently press onto paper towels or kitchen towel to remove any remaining moisture. (They don’t need to be bone dry.)

Combine flour, sugar, salt, baking powder/soda and caraway seeds in a large mixing bowl/Kitchen Aid.

Pour buttermilk into a separate bowl, then gently whisk in the egg, followed by the melted butter. Combine well. (You will feel your arteries hardening as you do this, but remember – we only live once!)

Gradually add wet mixture to dry mixture until well incorporated but not overworked, then, add the raisins during the last minute of your mixing.

Pour mixture into your pan and bake for about 60min (maybe 70), depending on your oven. A toothpick or bamboo skewer should come clean when checking for doneness, but don’t let this one get too dry.

After a few minutes out of the oven, and while still in the pan, melt some butter over the top and sprinkle with sugar.

Pro-tips: this freezes very well, but tends to turn south if left out for more than a few days (it will be gone by then!) This bread is great for slicing off a wedge/hunk and frying up in a skillet with butter, like cornbread.

Enjoy! I have to go check now, as I have one in the oven as we speak.

... Fresh out of the oven, perhaps a pinch more sugar than it needed. Guess I'll have to destroy the evidence.

Edited by CountZerpula
Proof Of Work!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

WOW, this looks really good... So, I have to ask... From what I saw reading this, it appears authentic... Are you from Ireland?  The only reason I'm asking is because the authentic recipes from all over the world are the ones that are best!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Snoopy said:

WOW, this looks really good... So, I have to ask... From what I saw reading this, it appears authentic... Are you from Ireland?  The only reason I'm asking is because the authentic recipes from all over the world are the ones that are best!

Thanks! And now you have visual confirmation. Your instincts are impressive!

No, not from Ireland. And I can't tell you how many times that I've been told that this isn't an 'authentic recipe'... and that's correct. It isn't. This isn't like your traditional soda breads, but it's great nonetheless.

We do have a recipe that came down in the family, but my Nana ditched it for this one that she got from her friend. That traditional recipe, as my great-uncle Gerald so aptly put, was "dry as a popcorn fart". He wouldn't eat it. It was a chore, and it was very, very dry.

Hope you like this one!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hubby's Irish - he loves soda bread.  
*meh....me less so, unless every slice is slavered with an inch of Welsh butter - otherwise yes, dry as a popcorn fart! ;)

Originally soda bread was knocked up as cheap as possible (for obvious reasons) but it looks like this recipe contains lots of lovely rich goodies. 
Thanks. I'll be giving this one a try - sure I will! :d_sunny:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.