Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'press'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • XRP
    • Please Read Before Posting
    • Press
    • General Discussion
    • Technical Discussion
    • Codius and Smart Contracts
    • Marketplace
    • Problem Solving
  • Interledger Protocol
    • Interledger Protocol Discussion
  • Other Technology
    • Alt-Coins and General Fintech
  • More
    • Fan Submissions
    • Off-Topic
    • Meta
    • Languages
  • Canadian Zerpers's Topics
  • Vegemite Ripplers's Topics
  • 2 the Moon! For Real. The Club's Topics
  • NY Zerpers - aka bitlicense island's Topics
  • Brackish Waters Club's Topics
  • Trading Places's Topics
  • Anti-Club Club's Topics
  • The Irish Brigade's Topics
  • Saloon's Request
  • XRP Trading And Price Speculation's Topics
  • The Crypto Buffett's Topics
  • Alt-Coin Trading And Price Speculation's Topics
  • Super serious Ripple club's Topics
  • Making Millions!'s Topics
  • Ripple - India's Topics
  • SWELL's Topics
  • Gospel Hour's Topics
  • Korean XRP Holders's Topics
  • Strayans lovin your work XRP!!!'s Topics
  • Technical Analysis (TA) Area's Topics
  • BTC diving deep club's Topics
  • Ripple Enamel Pin Club's Topics
  • XRP Wave Surfers's Topics
  • FUDster's retreat's Topics
  • Cooking with Snoopy's Topics
  • How it's all going to happen..'s Topics
  • Chocolate Fish's Topics
  • The Round Table's Topics
  • UK Hodlers's Topics
  • ˜”*°• Zerpmania •°*”˜'s Topics
  • XRP YouTube Videos's Topics
  • CRY ROOM's Topics
  • Night's Watch's Topics
  • CasinoCoin's Topics
  • XRP Think Tank's Topics
  • Allvor's Topics
  • NightClub's Topics
  • TeXRP's Topics
  • COIL Think Tank's Topics
  • Bob's Book Club's Topics
  • XRP FAQS's XRP Q an A’s

Calendars

  • Ripple Events
  • Vegemite Ripplers's Events
  • NY Zerpers - aka bitlicense island's Events
  • Brackish Waters Club's Events
  • Trading Places's Events
  • Anti-Club Club's Events
  • The Irish Brigade's Events
  • Saloon's Calendar
  • XRP Trading And Price Speculation's Events
  • The Crypto Buffett's Calendar
  • Alt-Coin Trading And Price Speculation's Events
  • Super serious Ripple club's Events
  • Making Millions!'s Events
  • Ripple - India's Events
  • SWELL's Events
  • Gospel Hour's Events
  • Korean XRP Holders's Events
  • Strayans lovin your work XRP!!!'s Events
  • Technical Analysis (TA) Area's Events
  • BTC diving deep club's Events
  • Ripple Enamel Pin Club's Events
  • XRP Wave Surfers's Events
  • FUDster's retreat's Events
  • Cooking with Snoopy's Events
  • Chocolate Fish's Events
  • The Round Table's Events
  • UK Hodlers's Events
  • XRP YouTube Videos's Events
  • CRY ROOM's Events
  • XRP Think Tank's Events
  • Allvor's Events
  • NightClub's Events
  • TeXRP's Events
  • COIL Think Tank's Events
  • Bob's Book Club's Calendar

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Interests


Location


Occupation


Country


Ripple Address


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation

Found 11 results
Minimum search term is 4 characters long. Can't find what you want? Click here for the custom google search instead.

  1. Hello everyone, Due to the overwhelming amount of XRP FUD out there, I decided to create a subreddit dedicated to it. You are all welcome to contribute: https://www.reddit.com/r/xrpfud/ Feel free to discuss bad journalism and general XRP FUD there.
  2. Hi guys, Year long lurker and grateful hodler. Thought I might introduce myself with an article I found while looking around. Not sure if it is anything but we do know SBI has a stake in R3 and I believe that some aspect of R3's software can use XRP? Keen to see what more experienced members think. https://cointelegraph.com/news/swift-ceo-reveals-plans-to-integrate-blockchain-consortium-r3s-corda-tech All the best and as always, hodl on! Rust.
  3. https://news4c.com/ripples-xrp-token-to-be-priced-at-692-30-in-due-time/
  4. https://www.pymnts.com/blockchain/bitcoin/2018/bitcoin-daily-cryptocurrency-cybercrime-trading-exchange/ This is an example of misleading Press. The title is confusing and misleading "Ripple's Bitcoin"? and a little concerning coming from a website called "Pymnts.com". (Payments?) Even though XRP is not mineable I did not know hackers can take over another person's computer to mine coins. One excerpt that was interesting... "With the growth of cryptocurrency, criminals are beginning to commit crypto crimes. Cybercriminals have come up with several techniques to steal digital coins, from “cryptojacking” to mining fraud and even account takeovers, Reuters reported. Through “cryptojacking,” for example, cybercriminals may take over a computer user’s browser and use their device to mine cryptocurrencies."
  5. https://ripplenews.tech/2018/01/16/cryptocurrencies-falling-lunar-new-year/ "This selloff has happened exactly 3 weeks before Lunar New Year each of the last 4 years."
  6. Hello everybody. Long time lurker, first time poster. I’ve been snooping around the forums for a fair while now, enjoying the eclectic mix of speculation, analysis and amusing kid’s aspirational Lamborghini dreams. All while attempting, as I’m sure we all are, of forming my own view of this potentially exciting utility-based crypto world. My views are my own and I have no intention of discussing, coercing or belittling yours within this space or attempt to shill or otherwise promote any other crypto. This is not the purpose of this post. I’d like to begin with saying sorry for the potentially inflammatory title to this post. I’m sure Bezerker is just a passionate Ripple and XRP fan who uses his google-fu skills to locate newly created content from the web to share with you all to help fuel the excitement he shares. However, perhaps the title helps emphasize one of my many points of this post - The slightly aggressive tone of the baited title encouraged you to click on this post, and here you are…. A bit of background. I’m an IT Security engineer working out of England over in the UK. Over the years I’ve enjoyed working for both British, European and US based companies predominantly focused on day-to-day operational and network security. This post is not designed to be a “I'm holier than thou” arrogant statement from someone in the industry, but rather a gentle reminder by someone with experience to be conscious of your online presence and perhaps re-evaluate your approach to some of the channels in which exciting news is delivered to you on a daily basis or how much information you reveal about yourself without knowing. Up until this point I had no interest in signing up to the forum but I felt something needed to be said. This may indeed be my first and last post and apologies if I don’t reply to any comments left in its wake. If this post successfully serves its purpose, perhaps a MOD could sticky it to the top with a more benign title. Now, for those of you that can not be bothered to read further into the giant wall of text I’m about to present to you, there is just two clear messages to take from this post, and they are as follows: *** Do not follow web links to websites that you cannot verify as a legitimate and trustworthy source, even if the story appeals to reinforce your passions or enrages you so much that you feel you must put right the wrongs of the author. – NO REALLY, DON’T! *** *** It’s been said many times before, Do NOT reveal your Crypto holdings – NO REALLY, DON’T *** Still with me? Ok, I’ll proceed with my somewhat disjointed explanations….. (Note - I decided the ‘Press’ section was the right place to create this post due to its relevance on the topics I’m about to address. This is after all where I find the largest majority of content which *could* lead to an increased threat to you, the loyal forum member.) Over the past few months I’ve become somewhat alarmed by the number of external articles posted under the guise of news. Often these externally linked websites are just pure speculative re-hashes of previously posted forum or website content, adding very little independent content. The majority of these sites follow the same pattern. Take the last 20 or so externally linked sites and you’ll be able to discount about 75% as they link to well known companies. Forbes, BBC, CNN….etc. Although they often rely on advertising revenue, they also provide huge amounts of original content over many subjects and employ large teams of employees to create it. The ones I’ll focus on are those with some of the following indicators: Previously unknown domain hostnames. Occasionally sub-sites from free hosting providers. A simple whois lookup on the domain name suggests the domain has only been registered within the few months, if that. The sites are simple blog pages (WordPress templates..etc). Usually the articles have an exciting title and are followed with a potentially fictitious author name, occasionally with a job title and the current date. The author name attempting to convey a sense of legitimacy and occasionally this is boosted by being accompanied with personable photo. More often than not, attempting to research these individuals further, yields little to no results. However this is not always the case (Sorry Hodor!). The content on the sites are split about 60/40% or higher ratio of advertisements and other external click-bait articles / adware to article content. Often the article itself has adverts between paragraphs. The content is simply a re-hash of public information. Usually of optimistic forum posts or rumours with no citations or references to official sources, designed to appeal to your sense of optimism of fear of a certain subject. If most of these indicators ring true, usually what we have here is a pure money making site. These are designed to attempt to entice you onto clicking on adverts in the page in order to earn the site creator money. Traditionally people attempting to make revenue on such sites would have to find their audience by working incredibly hard to push their sudo-legitimate sites to the top of google page listings. Often using a heady combination of search engine optimisation and site cross-refences (Such as other fake articles on common internet ‘article’ sites like ehow.com, ezinearticles.com…etc linking back to their sites). This is of course very time consuming, so they look to ensnare a captive audience who are more than willing to visit their website. Where better than a hyped-up forum of exited people hunting for that next positive or negative piece of information that could potentially affect their wallet? You may or not know that some refence based advertisements can earn people as much as $1+ per click without the visitor going on to even make a purchase on the destination website. Where there is interest and hype, there is money to be made either legitimately or illegitimately. In short - You don’t need to invest in cryptocurrency itself in order to make money from it. Although I digress somewhat – you only need to look at the recent discovery of Nano Ledger S hardware being sold on eBay in sealed boxes yet with pre-generated keys (allowing the bad actor to siphon off your funds at his leisure) to see a horrific example of this in play. So now you may be thinking to yourself “So what? I never click on adverts anyway. They’re not making money off me”. Here’s where things take a turn for the darker….. Some of you are likely to know that when you visit a webserver your IP address details are more than certainly logged in an access log, both at the server level and potentially at the application layer. (Yes, some of you are probably already thinking about one of the many ways you can attempt to obfuscate this, VPN tunnels, P2P networks, proxy servers…etc. – but hold your horses, I’ll get to that). As unlikely as it may seem or even be to exploit this information, this instantly provides a bad actor / website owner a potential vector into directly targeting you. All those sites you’ve visited with the next big story – well, they now have your IP address and know that you’re a likely holder of XRP if not other crypto currencies. Indeed - Do you even know the XRPChat administrators personally? Can you trust them to keep your access log details secure or not act upon them themselves? ***DISCLAIMER – this is absolutely not suggesting XRPChat owners are bad actors, but simply hypothetical food for thought*** What can someone do with just a simple IP address you ask? Well. Perhaps nothing, perhaps everything. You only need to look at the horrific recent occurrences in the US of ‘Swatting’, causing armed officers to storm innocent people’s houses, sometimes with terrible consequences. Often the innocent’s information given to law enforcement agencies is based off simple reconnaissance and enumeration of the gamer’s IP address and its geo-location information, nickname/gamer ID and their associated social media content. A lot of this information on forum users is also freely available. Sadly this is not where it ends and the above example is merely child’s play in comparison to some of the more advanced techniques that could be utilized against you. IT security is a hot topic now as we enter a world dominated by computer assisted processes. Companies play a constant cat and mouse game attempting to keep on top of new vulnerabilities and associated exploits released by legitimate security researchers and underground hackers. There’s not a day that goes by that the large OS or software producers (whether it's a traditional Linux/UNIX/Windows/MAC operating system, a mobile phone OS or even those responsible for the firmware on your smart TV or fitness tracker) aren’t releasing patches to address known vulnerabilities in software. Some of you may be confident in your patching schedules and be lucky enough to own the latest and greatest devices on the market of which you have, perhaps misplaced, confidence in to be secure enough to trust your personal information to. Others of you will likely be running old models of phones with old versions of Android or other OS which have since been retired from active development and no longer benefit from timely patching. You know, that phone that you hold a crypto software wallet on and keep an unencrypted text file of all your website login details in? Perhaps you’ve even rooted it to take advantage of a more advanced feature set, allowing any malicious code to potentially access low level system files? This brings me to those few websites that may have the potential to ruin your day even if your IP address is not revealed directly... I’m sad to say that there is a nefarious contingent of websites that exist with the sole purpose of exploiting weaknesses in something as simple as your web browser. You only need to google ‘browser exploitation’ for a myriad of examples on this topic. Anything from cookie tracking injection to code execution on your machine, to even total reverse shell access to your workstation is _potentially_ possible. Do not underestimate this. You can bounce your connection all the way around the world using a VPN service, but this is not going to help you should your browser or other application be compromised. The same goes for Tor or other P2P networks. Example - Back In 2013 it was revealed that the FBI were using a then unknown vulnerability in the Firefox browser’s implementation of JavaScript to reveal the real IPs of users on the network. If you think the FBI are at the forefront of online security activities, think again. Classic phishing sites are also one to look out for. The domain name looks to be legitimate but in reality its slightly off the names you’re actually familiar with. getehub.net looks a lot like gatehub.net, but the former is a pure pass-through credential harvesting phishing site with all the looks of the official service. According to Gatehub’s security bulletins it appears that many people have lost funds via such sites. Usually either by a simple typo, or you’ve guessed it, following a bad link in an email or public forum. And it doesn’t just stop there. Another example - Recently a friend of mine asked him to quickly audit his home network. On the face of it, everything seemed relatively in order. That was up until the point that I discovered, unbeknownst to him, that a member of his family had exposed his home network attached storage device to the internet via firewall rules on his home router (you know, one of those NAS devices made by QNAP, Synology and the likes to store his family photos on so that if he dropped his laptop the memories would be safe and backed up). The family member wanted to be able to access the web-frontend for the device when they were out of the home in order to access or save files to it. Hey, why not huh? Well it turns out that this device had not been patched in forever and a day and was several firmware releases out of date. Sadly, during this time several severe web based vulnerabilities had been discovered by security researchers along with proof of concept exploits able to take control of this device. When exploited, not only would an attacker then have access to the complete contents of the device, but they would be able to pivot into his network unimpeded by his router’s firewall capability in order to launch attacks against his internal network’s devices and workstations. As we move into the time of the internet of things, many of us now have devices which could potentially increase our chances to be successfully targeted by the very people running those innocuous looking websites. Perhaps you now have a printer you can print photos to while away from your house? Perhaps you can turn your lights on and off or fire up your boiler while you’re on your way back from work? CCTV monitoring? These devices are all becoming potential attack vectors into your home. I was lucky enough to attend Defcon last year which is one of the better known hacker conventions. You can bet your bollocks to a barn dance that IoT devices are a hot topic right now and assure you that in the dimly lit hotel room parties, Vegas bars and back rooms of vendor sponsored free-beer events, these sort of non-public/0-day exploits are increasingly being traded around like hot cakes (or candy for you yankees). So, what’s in an IP address? Why should I question that random news site? You should now be in a position to tell me. If you’ve ever been part of a large office based organisation, you will have likely have had to complete a yearly IT security based training course for policy or compliance reasons. This will usually party drill home how important it is not to click on random links delivered to you in spam or phishing emails for the very reasons I’ve outlined. Most of us will know this already. So if we know this, and stick to it….. why would you click on a random link in a public forum? Finally. The topic of hardware wallets. Yes – they’re great. They take lots of the risk associated with a software wallet away and remove your dependency on a relatively unknown exchange to hold them for you. But please, please be aware that these should only be depended on as a ‘security in depth’ approach. Just like running a firewall, an up to date antivirus solution or an intruder detection system – these are simply layers of security to improve your security posture and not one should be considered fool proof. Where you build strength on one hand, you potentially weaken the other. Storing digital currency on a physical device is the equivalent withdrawing all your money from the bank and hiding it under your mattress. Have you lost redundancy and recovery by doing so? Do you store a backup or recovery phrase in another secure geographical location? Do you trust this location? Are you more at risk of fire and water damage? How about deliberate or accidental theft? Did you bury it? What are the risks? Do you place it in a rented bank vault deposit box? I’d be surprised if many do! Are you 100% confident that if your computer was breached that someone would still be unable to interfere or replace the software wallet on your machine, potentially modifying your next trade instructions at the application or network stack, even though you think you’re confirming the correct transaction physically on your device? If someone managed to physically locate you using some of the methodology outlined previously, could you honestly attest to the fact that under potentially extreme duress that you wouldn’t hand over the device along with the passcode? Say, if your life was at risk. These are all questions you must be able to answer and this reasoning should help justify why you must NEVER, NEVER reveal your crypto holding on a public forum and if you do – well, quite simply, you’re an idiot. For this reason, Ripple employees are never going to confirm exactly how much crypto they hold and how they store it, so stop asking! One thing’s for sure, it’s a lot more secure than yours! ? Now there will be people after having read all this that will be chomping at the bit to whip out their e-peen and argue the toss or emphasise subtitle inaccuracies in my post, after all, that’s what internet forum replies and YouTube comments sections are for, right? Perhaps you have the burning urge to regale me with stories of how you regularly don a hat with fake beard and affix fake plates to your car right before driving to an open wifi network you know or internet café with no physical cameras, fire up your laptop that has never been purchased or registered to yourself, spoof the MAC address, use a memory-only OS such as ‘Tails’ and connect via the Tor network in order to use these forums? Perhaps you fire up a virtual machine on an isolated VLAN on your network before establishing a VPN session to Timbuktu in order to browse, then after every session securely erase your VM image before hitting the physical disk with a large sledge hammer? This is great, and I have admiration for you for having such a strong security and privacy mindset which leads you into relatively complex processes that I certainly wouldn’t bother with in order to casually browse internet forums. There will be exceptions to my post and perhaps my suggestions are not for you. However, I’m aiming here for your average forum user like me… Stay safe out there Rippleers! Pottymoose P.S. No - I can’t help you ‘hack’ your sister’s Hotmail account, No – I wont tell you if I have any exposure to crypto, Yes – It’s in that place that I put that thing that time. @JoelKatz – love your work & blog @Hodor – I enjoy your unwavering enthusiasm
  7. Found this whitepaper document from the financial service provider Evry. It goes in to the development in the scandinavian banking sector and plans for banks in 2020. RippleNet is mentioned as probably the most promising of any Blockchain solution for the banking system. Evry is one of the most known software and services providers in Scandinavia. The biggest IT company in Norway, a country among the ones with the best liquidity in the economy and least corruption on the planet. quote: "Ripple plans to grow and add more bank partnerships in the near future. There have been strong indications that key Nordic financial institutions are experimenting with the Ripple network, and are considering a partnership." Western Union is shown to have been working with Ripplenet since 2015 if you scroll to pictures at the bottom of the page. Edit: It is from 2015. Warning. PDF file. https://www.evry.com/globalassets/insight/bank2020/bank-2020---blockchain-powering-the-internet-of-value---whitepaper.pdf
  8. https://ripple.com/xrp/xrp-stacks-digital-assets/
  9. https://ripple.com/insights/does-it-matter-how-i-pay/?platform=hootsuite
  10. http://m.ytn.co.kr/news_view.php?s_mcd=0102&key=201708170728106778&pos=002 I'm not sure if google can translate it but, I will state the brief summary. Bank's blockchain adoption process is speeding up, (if time allows) starting Q2 of year customers will be able to make transactions with minimal personal identification. Korea used to have heavy identification system with encryption cards + 공인인증서 (I couldn't find what this is called in English). However, they are planning on changing this so that they could reduce 1. security costs 2. transaction costs by excluding the medium (switching to P2P). Some of the names that I could think of currently are BTC, XRP, and perhaps Civic?? However, nothing is certain at the moment. One of the Korea's largest bank is planning on making their own coins called 'webee coin'. No news is around in Korea saying they will be adopting Ripple or XRP
  11. Always grateful when fellow members of the Crypto-community spreads good news about Ripple XRP. The Modern Investor on Youtube is one of these people and it appears that he is a frequent lurker on XRPchat. What's your handle MI? say HI! #XRPtheStandard #OurTimeWillCome
×
×
  • Create New...