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  1. I took a few nights to go ahead and build a site with most of Ripple's functionality. It's essentially a 1-page cold-wallet version of RippleTrade. Everything is client-side and nothing stored or processed by any servers other than the Ripple network. https://www.theworldexchange.net/ Hopefully this spurs more interest in people using Ripple as more than just a currency.
  2. DEFINITIONS Cold Storage (cold wallets) To create a cold wallet, first lets try to use a broadly accepted definition for that: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Cold_storage Adaptation: In order to keep a reserve of ripple balances offline, I understand that the balances must be held by a key that has never been online and is out of the reach of online thieves. Wallet or Account A pair of public and private cryptographic keys that can hold value and create transactions (Master/Regular Key and Public Key). Wallet File A file that can be opened by a client which will have access to an account's Master/Regular Key in order to create transactions. 1 - Prepare the environment: The higher the level, the more secure. There are many levels of paranoia that one can escalate in order to be 100000000% sure nobody can reach the keys, but lets focus in practical everyday usage. The simplest path, ideal for safe computers and for normal amounts is Level 1 or 2. For those who need more certainty, please read the other levels. You can also mix the methods. Level 1: If you trust your computer is safe, download the client in your current OS and disconnect from any network. Level 2: If you trust your computer is safe, use virtual box to create a VM with a fresh OS (i.e. a clean Ubuntu), open the new OS, update it and download the client in the fresh OS. Level 3: If you trust your computer is safe, use virtual box to create a VM with a fresh OS (i.e. a clean Ubuntu), open the new OS, update it and build your own client from the github repo in the fresh OS. Level 4: If you trust your computer is safe, create an Ubunutu Live USB or CD, boot your machine using this media for a Live CD session, and download the client in the fresh OS or build your own client from the github repo in the fresh OS. Level 5: Buy a new computer meant to be offline forever, turn it on far away from any kind of network connection, download the client (or build it) in another safe computer, disconnect from the internet, copy it to a brand new portable media (i.e. USB) and copy it again to the new computer. Level 6: Suggestions accepted 2 - Create the wallet: In the environment you prepared, open the ripple client, go to create new account/create_an_empty_account, choose a place to save the wallet file. - - if the computer you are will go online again, save the file in an external media and remove the media before reconnecting to the internet. Choose a strong password and you will be presented to the option of saving your Secret Key. Write the Secret Key in a paper, or take a picture from it (not with your mobile phone!) or any other safe method to store it. Save the wallet file in several offline medias (USB), and never use them in your online computer, keep them private. You can use encrypted volumes if you want. Save your password too. The password alone can't do any harm, so you can use traditional password managers and you can have many online backups of it. Save your public key to a text file and backup it (you will need it every time you will send money to this account). Double check to see if the text file matches the public key in the client's top right corner. Close the client, remove the external medias, clean the clipboard. 3 - Activate the wallet: Open the text file with the public key in an online computer. Open one of your online accounts with the client. Send some XRP (50) to the cold wallet's public address. Check the address at https://www.ripplecharts.com/#/graph, or any ledger explorer you trust. DONE! OPTIONAL Validate the wallet: Will you send 1MM USD to this account without validating it? There is a risk balancing thinking you must do now. Offline Validation, by @jn_r, (I wrote a step by step tutorial about creating offline transactions here). If offline validation doesn't work for you, you may try this: In an offline Ubuntu Live CD session, plug the USB with the wallet file in, open the client and open the cold wallet. Remove the USB. Connect to the internet just for the time necessary for the client to show you the account received 50 XRP. If there is 50 XRP in the account, you are all good and you can send your money there. If there is not, there was an error in the process. Close the client, kill the Live CD session. Will this procedure invalidate your cold storage? IDK, up to you. DISCLAIMER Please, follow this instructions if you want at your own risk, this is not in any way professional advice. CONTRIBUTIONS Security experts are invited to step up and improve this method.
  3. Hello Guys, I am new to this forum and invested in XRP. I want to keep my holdings in a cold wallet and bit confused between the two options. As far as I know, keeping the "toast wallet" in a pen drive which is mostly offline is just like using "Ledger Nano S". The only difference is that ledger nano can keep coins other than xrp as well. I want some expert opinions on this because I am willing to use a cold wallet for the long term and it will be great if I can keep my holdings equally safe with toast wallet. I am more interested in toast wallet because it costs nothing. Also, even if I purchase other altcoins, I am thinking about installing Linux in a pen drive and keeping different cold wallets into that pen drive holding different coins. I think there should not be a problem. Looking for suggestions and recommendations
  4. Hi everybody! Just lost a bunch of XRP using the jatchili minimalist ripple client to generate my cold wallet. Per the linked post, it seems as though the issue is using the tool on Safari browser, which I was. The secret key I was given doesn't belong to my cold wallet address (even though both showed on the client at the same time and I printed it) - I've confirmed this on multiple sites. When I first set up the cold wallet, I did a test send to the address and it worked fine, I could validate that the XRP transferred and I didn't think I also should test my ability to send FROM the wallet, or test the key at all. That was my mistake. Only after I transferred the bulk of my XRP did I attempt a transfer any out. Then I realized that my key is useless and my wallet is without an owner. Is there any chance of Ripple giving these funds back to me? I mean, this web client is recommended in a number of posts of the Ripple forum, and I'm not the only user to have these issues. Seems like they must know about the problem and a warning would have been nice.
  5. that's simply my question. How to send to a desktop wallet or an exchange from a cold wallet having the secret and the public passwords?
  6. Hello all, I've released a new version of my wallet generator called RippleWarpWallet! You can check out the hosted version here: https://termhn.github.io/ripplewarpwallet and the GitHub repo here: https://github.com/termhn/ripplewarpwallet What is RippleWarpWallet? RippleWarpWallet is a fork of the original WarpWallet used for making Ripple wallets instead of bitcoin ones. It is a deterministic Ripple wallet generator. What this means is that you never have to save or store your secret key directly anywhere. Instead, you pick a good passphrase - see the section of the page about choosing a password - and never use it for anything else. Then, whenever you want to access your actual secret key, you put your password back into RippleWarpWallet and it will generate the same address as before as long as the same password was used as input. This is what "deterministic" means. Much like other wallet generators, all of this is done on your computer only; an external server is never contacted after you download the inital page. This has a number of benefits, but also a number of possible weaknesses. The benefits are that, in theory, you don't have to store your password anywhere but in your own brain. You can use a method like a mnemonic peg to memorize a password very thoroughly. However, even if you do store your password, you'll be guarded against the most common malware that tries to specifically steal crypto wallets since your password will not be in the form that they are looking for. This allows you to disguise your crypto password in ways that make it look quite innocuous unless someone is targeting you specifically, which is quite unlikely unless you have a ridiculous sum that you regularly advertise online. The weaknesses are that, if you choose a bad password, an attacker could very easily take your coins, since the only thing they need to be able to generate your secret key (and therefore take control of your wallet) is your password. WarpWallet adds two improvements over the traditional brainwallet to try to mitigate these weaknesses: (1) WarpWallet uses scrypt to make address generation both memory and time-intensive. This means that it takes a matter of several seconds to run a password through the algorithm and get the resulting private and public key, rather than a matter of a fraction of a millisecond like with a traditional brainwallet generator. (2) you can "salt" your passphrase with your email address. Though salting is optional, we recommend it. Any attacker of WarpWallet addresses would have to target you individually, rather than netting you in a wider, generic attack, since they would need to add your email address together with your password. And your email is trivial to remember, so why not? However, even with these safegaurds, it's not infallible. If you use a bad password, even with a salt, your coins are still easily stolen. This is why I have a whole section on the tool dedicated to how to choose a good password. The main thing that I added in this version of the tool is the ability to verify that the code in the GitHub repository is the same code that is compiled and hosted on the live web version. What does this mean for you as far as security? If you trust the code in the repository, then you can trust the code on the web version You are able to verify that I'm not adding any back doors to the web hosted version that aren't present in the uncompiled source code (this kind of vulnerability in "open source" wallets has been used to great, or awful, effect with other cryptocurrencies). The uncompiled source code is actually quite short and easy to understand, so it's much easier for community members that know javascript (or even yourself) to analyze it. It also uses directly other open source libraries for all the cryptographic and ripple-specific functions, only tying them together into an easy to use interface. This means that, again, the actual code itself is quite easy to understand and verify. In order to verify this for yourself, head over to the github page: https://github.com/termhn/ripplewarpwallet and follow the instructions there. It would be awesome for some community members to do this, and for anyone willing to inspect the code as well and post their results and any concerns they have. That's how open source programs can start to be trusted and where the security comes from: when many eyes are looking at something, it's a lot harder for bugs or intentional security loopholes to sneak through. If you're a programmer and want to implement WarpWallet yourself, here is the algorithm used. Ripple-specific functions are part of the ripple-keypairs npm package, which is a sub-package used directly by the official ripple-lib npm package. s1 = scrypt(key=(passphrase||0x1), salt=(salt||0x1), N=218, r=8, p=1, dkLen=32) s2 = pbkdf2(key=(passphrase||0x2), salt=(salt||0x2), c=216, dkLen=32, prf=HMAC_SHA256) secret = generateSeed(s1 ⊕ s2) keypair = deriveKeypair(secret) address = deriveAddress(keypair.publicKey)
  7. Right lets just start by saying I feel sick, physically sick,. Over Christmas I had family up and we got talking about crypto, after a bit of chatting they decided that they would like to invest in some XRP but with exchanges overwhelmed and registrations being suspended they asked if I would mind acting as the middleman and putting the money through my bank and on to the exchange, personally I was against this as I know how volatile things can be and although I'm happy to loose my money; I'm not so happy to risk other peoples. I finally caved and put a modest £2k on to the exchange for them with 50% going on a selection of alts and 50% going on XRP, they wanted 100XRP setting aside In a wallet for the grandkids a long ways down the line and the rest in to their wallet. so today after the price of XRP dropped and with them having around £1k in profit from their altcoins they asked me to trade those in and pick up more XRP, happily I obliged. Come tonight and I'm ready to move the XRP from Binance to their wallet, I copy their wallet address but before I send I double checked the address, to my horror all their XRP had been taken out on the 31st Dec. Below are the two wallets. https://bithomp.com/explorer/rEAvsfoR3GN8D7YKEdCGBZj81QkFXyfGPv https://bithomp.com/explorer/rftjDErSDDdq93zQK9T6Gxf4aEHcxrv9xP Both these wallets were cold wallets, they were generated and then printed out, their private keys only stored on paper, they were both generated by using https://ihomp.github.io/ripply-paper-wallet/coldwallet-SHA1-cdfbe3260927b6073180a1099f02ef99ce0495e8.html The only thing I can think of is the wallet generator site itself is where the account was compromised! Has anyone else used this particular wallet generator, can anyone clarify its safety / security? As I said earlier I feel physically sick, I know to a lot of people its not a lot of money, but I feel personally responsible, my gut instinct to not play with other peoples money was right and now the only option I feel I have is to reimburse them out of my own wallet. CR
  8. Part of the new Community Beginners Guide series. Other guides in this series: Beginners Guide: Intro. Quick overview of the series and purpose of the guides Beginners Guide: XRP First Steps Simple first steps to acquiring XRP including 1) opening a wallet, 2) wallet funding/ buying XRP, and 3) sending the first XRP. Beginners Guide: Desktop Wallet Step by step instructions in downloading and installing XRP CHAT WALLET, the creation and activation of new wallet and the first few steps to becoming a ripple user. Disclaimer: This post is goes over what a wallet is, what the common different types of wallets are and their differences, and how wallets can be used at a basic level. It doesn't discuss Ripple-specific details of wallets, like re-keying an account. Also, it doesn't explain explicitly how to make a wallet. See other community guides for that information. Difficulty level: LOW One thing that many people who are new to Ripple, or cryptocurrency in general, do not understand is what a wallet actually is. I think this is one of the places that cryptos need to up their game in order to continue to gain adoption because the way things are named in cryptocurrency can easily create confusion about what is actually happening. First you need to undertand what a wallet is not. A wallet is not like a physical wallet. There is not a file that contains a copy of all of your coins. A wallet it not like a bank vault. There's not server or hard drive that has your wallet stored on it as a folder with coins inside it like a bank vault. So, what is a wallet? A good real-world analogy is that a "wallet" in cryptocurrency is analogous to your seal or stamp plus your name. Think of cryptocurrencies like a community ledger board where no history is ever erased and anyone can come up to the board and tell everyone else that they have transferred some number of coins to someone else on the board. They way they do this it using their seal of authenticity. Everyone else can verify that that person is the one who wrote the message on the community ledger because their seal is on the message. And they know who the money came from and where it went to based on the name of the person sending and receiving it. If you wanted to know how much any person held then you would go through the entire ledger since the beginning of history and count up how much they have received and how much they have sent. This is how a wallet works in cryptocurrency. Except, in cryptocurrency, your seal (actually, the device you use to imprint your seal) is replaced by your "private" or "secret" key. It's like a seal in real life. If you lose exclusive access to the use of your seal, anyone who comes into possession of it can send a message in your name without others being able to know. In cryptocurrency, this means that anyone who has your private key can make a transaction using your coins without anyone else being able to know it's not you. So, with this information, let's get a bit more technical. A "wallet" is literally just a secret key, which is just a number. It is displayed in a format that uses letters and numbers instead of just the numerals we normally use, because if it didn't then it would be very long to display. This is like your seal in our earlier analogy. From the secret key, you can derive the public address mathematically. The public address is like your name in the earlier analogy. It is also just a number, same as the secret key. This public address is where you or other people will send coins so that they go in your "wallet" (more accurately, so that others know your public address should now own them). However, from the public address, you cannot easily figure out the secret key (technically you could, but the amount of computational time it would take is astronomical, like, at the current power and using current algorithms, more than the time that the universe has existed until now). You can think of this like how on a seal you generally have an easily recognizable symbol or word that links the symbol to a person. However, even if you know that symbol and have seen the seal, it is not easy to duplicate the device used to create the seal, which is your secret key. Of course, in cryptocurrency, this is much more secure than a seal in real life because it's much harder to actually go backwards from a public address to a secret key than it is to duplicate a seal. So, if you know a secret key then you can do whatever you want with the funds that are sent to the public address that is linked to that secret key. Why is this? Well, when you make a transaction, what you are doing at a very basic level is making a message that says "I am the owner of <your public address>. I am giving <number of xrp> to <address you're sending to>." Then, you use your private (secret) key to "digitally sign" the message. This is like applying your seal in the earlier analogy. Since your public address and secret key are linked, signing the message allows other people to verify that the person who has the private key linked to the address that the funds are coming from is really the one who made that message. The next time a new block is added to the blockchain, your message is looked at by the network, and if it determines that the signature is correct and that you have enough funds to make the transaction, your message will be added to the block and then added to the blockchain. From that point onwards, anyone who wants to can go and see/verify that the owner of that public address sent those coins to the other public address, and so that is how a wallet "holds value." There's not actually a piece of hard drive space or something that stores a unique "coin" file under your address, there is only the record of a number of coins being transferred from one account to the next in a trusted manner. In order to actually use the secret key (wallet) to interact with the network, you use a piece of wallet software, not to be confused with the wallet itself. This wallet software (among other things) automatically performs this "digital signing" operation. This is not the same thing as a wallet. Wallet software does not actually store any value. It only allows you to use the value stored in the actual wallet (the secret key) and do things with it on the ripple network. You can import any valid secret key into any valid piece of wallet software and use it to make transactions from that wallet. Now, you may have heard of something called a "paper wallet" or "cold wallet" or "hot wallet". What are these? A paper wallet originally meant literally a wallet that you print onto a piece of paper. Since a wallet is just a secret key, the most basic form of a paper wallet is literally writing down by hand your secret key on a piece of paper. Now, to make things easier on the user, most paper wallets will include the secret key, the public address, and a QR code matching each. The QR code is just another way to encode or display the number that is easy for a computer to interpret if you take a picture of it. Paper wallets are one type of "cold wallet," a cold wallet being any secret key that has never touched (been stored on) a computer that was connected to the internet at the time it was stored on that computer. A "hot wallet" is a wallet whose secret key has been stored on a computer that was connected to the internet. If you make a "cold" paper wallet, as long as you don't lose the paper wallet, don't physically show anyone else the private key, and don't type it into an internet-connected computer, you'll be the only one with access to it. As soon as you type it into an internet-connected computer, that wallet is now "hot" and has, theoretically, a chance to be stolen if your computer or any other piece of the path it travels is infected with some kind of malware. With this knowledge, the best practice is to have a "hot wallet" for XRP that you think you might want to spend in the short term, some small amount. Then you make a cold paper wallet and store any significant amount of XRP you buy in it. When you decide you want to sell it or use it months or years down the line, you enter the private key from the paper wallet or another way of storing it into any piece of ripple wallet software on a computer and internet connection you trust and send all the ripple to wherever you want it to go. Since this wallet is now "hot," you would ideally then make a new paper wallet and send any ripple you want to keep storing in it. Alternatively to entering the secret key into an internet connected computer and making the wallet hot, you can use what are called "offline transactions" to keep the wallet cold and still send ripple from it, which I could explain in more detail if you'd like. Now, there are some other alternatives to paper wallets for cold wallet options. I would argue that a superior option to a paper wallet is a deterministic wallet that uses a good passphrase. A deterministic wallet basically means that you make a passphrase that you remember (or write down and store somewhere safe, much like a paper wallet) which can then be used to derive a single secret key and from that secret key a public address linked to it. Every time you enter the same passphrase into the piece of software you used, it will give you the same secret key and public address. Therefore, you don't have to store the private key anywhere since you will always have access to it as long as you know the password. The advantage of this is that you can make a very good but easy to remember password and use it to generate your wallet address and not actually have to store anything physical anywhere. A private key would be almost impossible for anyone to memorize reliably, but a good mnemonic password (described below) can offer superior security and is able to be easily memorized. To then use (spend) the funds in your wallet at some later date, you would go back to the same tool you used to generate the wallet, input your passphrase, and it would give you the same secret key which you could then use exactly like a paper wallet secret key by entering it into some wallet software and either making it hot or using offline transactions. If you use a good deterministic wallet generator and a good password, this is one of the most secure options available. Alternatively, if you use a bad password, you could be royally screwed. If you want to go the paper wallet route, you'd be using this tool: https://github.com/ihomp/ripply-paper-wallet If you want to go the deterministic route, you'd be using this tool: https://termhn.github.io/ripplewarpwallet
  9. <<UPDATED THE TUTORIAL TO USE A NEW WALLET>> Please see last post for notes -Updated Jan 12, 2018 Part of the new Community Beginners Guide series. Other guides in this series: Beginners Guide: Into. Quick overview of the series and purpose of the guides Beginners Guide: XRP First Steps Simple first steps to acquiring XRP including 1) opening a wallet, 2) wallet funding/ buying XRP, and 3) sending the first XRP. Beginners Guide: Desktop Wallet Step by step instructions in downloading and installing XRP CHAT WALLET, the creation and activation of new wallet and the first few steps to becoming a ripple user. Beginners Guide: What is a wallet? How do my coins get stored? How does cryptocurrency work anyway? This post goes over what a wallet is, what the common different types of wallets are and their differences, and how wallets can be used at a basic level. Disclaimer: This post features creating a cold ripple wallet and assumes you know what ripple, wallets and how secret vs. public keys work and is offered ‘as is’ and accepts no responsibility for any damage or losses incurred etc. Users are encouraged to take normal safety precautions when online (ex: antivirus, incognito mode, checking links, etc.) Difficulty level: LOW Hints: The images are also direct links What Is a Cold Wallet? Cold wallets, also referred to as a paper wallet, are secure backups of cryptocurrency wallets. They are nominally stored offline in secure locations and are used to secure high value amounts that are not accessed often (the opposite of a hot wallet which is usually stored in an easily accessed area for frequent use). The secret key is generated securely and is not shared with anyone other than the holder of the cold/paper wallet. Easy Way to Generate a Cold Wallet WARNING FOR APPLE USERS Link: Issues with Ripple Wallets and Safari Attention for MAC users: Use ONLY Google Chrome as your browser for all Ripple wallets listed here. Do not use Safari when using any "web" based wallets There are issues with older wallets and Safari's Javascript engine. There are some community tools that have been created to help in the creation of cold/ paper wallets. One such tool can be found at https://bithomp.com/paperwallet/. The page will look like the illustration below Your Ripple address, the public key that can be shared or monitored on the ripple network. You can have funds sent to this wallet via this address from any other ripple wallet. You Secrete Key, how you prove ownership over a wallet and gives withdraw rights. DO NOT SHARE Click here to create new wallet. Note: Although generated your new ripple wallet is not active until the network minimum of 20 XRP is deposited. How to Restore Funds from a Paper Wallet Option 1) - Use one of the light Ripple clients This one has a nice interface: https://www.theworldexchange.net/ This one is pretty raw & minimalist: https://jatchili.github.io/minimalist-ripple-client/ Option 2) - Use GateHub (requires identity verification) Register at https://gatehub.net Navigate to Wallets and click + (Add New) and import your Ripple secret key. Note: For more advanced users the the wallet could be generated on an offline or airgapped computer by copying the webpage code and transferring it by means of a memory device. Note: For added security be sure to clear your web browsers cache, have a machine free of viruses and take other general precautions. Visit Links & Resources and Our Picks for other tutorials for more advanced methods.
  10. I'm sure this is old news for many of the members here but it might be useful for newer members or lurkers. I have seen thousands of XRP cold wallets sucessfully sold on eBay, some empty and some pre-loaded with XRP. Despite claims in the listings that "all security keys are destroyed after production", the fatal security flaw with every last one of them is that you are trusting that no one in the entire manufacturing process took a photo of or wrote down the secret key. There is a period of time before the scratch-off material is applied, when the secret key is visible to anyone in the manufacturing facility. Some wallets even have the secret key uncovered on the finished product. People may be used to scratch-off cards like gift cards or lottery tickets being secure but they are produced under high-security. These wallets come with no such assurance. These products are potentially a time-bomb in that the stolen key may not be used for a long time, lulling the new owner into thinking it is secure. They have no recourse if down the road their wallet is emptied. Those potential victims may even wrongly blame Ripple the company, causing public relations problems.
  11. Hi so I want to securely store XRP on an offline wallet for an extended period. What is the safest longterm method for securing XRP? Is it using a cold wallet generator like this: https://github.com/tagawa/ripply-paper-wallet Also, is there anything I need to be mindful of or check as I create and load this wallet for storage?
  12. I have setup a cold wallet on an offline ubuntu machine. Its working well, but I am looking to fix the final part of the puzzle which is the QR Code. I would to install QR Code generating software but its seems most ubuntu software is installed via the software center. I have been trying to download the software on another computer but it seems like there's dependencies that need to be installed. I tried installing the dependencies but it seems never ending. I have tried to install qrencode and zint, but haven't succeeded any suggestions? other than connecting to the software center which defeats the purpose of the cold wallet.
  13. Hi I'm very green at crypto I have heard of bankcoin and stored value where the value is not volatile stable have you heard of bankcoin
  14. Wondering what kind of computer should I get for storing a cold wallet. I am thinking of getting a cheap used desktop for under $100 with Win 7
  15. In order to keep an account 100% offline, or to diminish the risks of managing a high value account by bringing it online only when it is extremely necessary, the ripple desktop wallet provides a tool to create, sign and save transactions in an offline computer that can be published using an online computer. Requirements: An offline computer. A cold wallet - (more info here) A safe USB drive 1 - Get your account's sequence number: Use your public address in one of this tools: https://ripple.com/build/websocket-tool/#account_info - It will be the "sequence" result. http://rippleok.com/ - The sequence number is on the top left. 2 - Using the Desktop Wallet Make sure the desktop wallet is in offline mode in settings/network_settings Open your wallet file Go to settings/cold_wallet_settings Choose the location to save the signed transactions (probably an USB that will be used to move the transactions to an online computer). Add the sequence number you got in "1" Create the transaction(s) you want (payments, trust sets, flag changes, etc), They will be saved in the location you chose Close the wallet, remove the USB (if you are using one) 3 - Publishing the transactions Plug your USB in a computer connected to the internet. Open the desktop wallet Make sure it is in "online mode" Do not open any wallet file, click on the "Submit Txn" button Add your transactions Click on "Submit" That's it. You created valid transactions in the ripple ledger without using your Master Key in an online computer.
  16. Ive been doing a lot of reading and chatting with fellow investors regarding security and safety of our XRPs and BTCs. it seems I cant come to a definite answer, so ill ask here: What do you consider better in terms of security? a cold wallet i.e. rippex, exodus, etc. or gatehub?
  17. Hi all Titel says it pretty much: If I (newbie) get it right, then as soon as secret key is entered in an internet connected PC, the wallet is cold. Now, at some point I'm going to plug in the usb into the pc, no? Say I want to send sth from the usb, ehm.. I'll have to enter the secret key no? So how do I keep a 70$ stick wallet cold? Confused... Thanks for your help!
  18. Hello Guys, I want to make a cold wallet to save a part of my ripple coins. I found https://github.com/ripply-eu/ripply-paper-wallet is this wallet trustworthy? Thanks
  19. Hi everyone, My name is Rafael, Im the CEO at Rippex, an almost 2 yo ripple gateway that issues BRL in the RCL and keeps 100%+ reserves in segregated accounts. As everybody knows, Rippletrade is closing and the end-user wallet applications will have to be provided by the community gateways or independent wallet providers, and many people are asking about alternatives to rippletrade. As some of you already know, we have fixed a bug and made available a desktop wallet created by Ripple's team. You can download it at: https://rippex.net/carteira-ripple-eng.php#/ Why did we do that? Because we think its very important to keep the Master Key totally private, since it is the ultimate authority over a ripple account. The desktop client does that by creating and saving the wallet files locally, never sending it over the internet, not even in an encrypted channel. The desktop client has all the necessary functions to create wallets (even cold wallets), watch accounts, pay, trade, and manage account flags. There are other potential functions like offline signing that are developed but still require some bug killing. Another important working feature is creating and revoking regular keys. This is awesome because it allows managing an account without using the Master Key, so the later can be kept totally private and offline, and used only in an emergency situation. But how to do that? In the settings/security settings tab, there is a Generate Regular Key function: After that, click on "save wallet file", choose a strong password, and you will see: Now you can get the new file and use it in an online computer. You will see this file still caries the same public address, but the Master Key is kept in another file. Another thing (I think, never tested it) you can do is to use regular keys to create accounts in online wallet providers like Gatehub. This is good for you, and good for them, this is why: Whenever your account's privacy is threatened, because you think your computer was compromised, or your online wallet provider was attacked, or whatever, you can use the Master Key you kept safe and private to revoke the regular key, and your account is safe again. The attacker wont be able to create transactions after that. As I said before, our dev resources to keep this project are scarce since we are focusing on other things, but if there is help from the community, the project may survive. Repo: https://github.com/rippex/ripple-client-desktop Regular Key Documentation: https://ripple.com/build/transactions/#setregularkey Cheers, Rafael
  20. Hi everyone, So I've been using jatchili's cold wallet generator and wondering what the purpose of the username field is? It seems you can connect to the ripple servers without supplying this, so I don't see the point of it. Also, when I send XRP tokens from my Gatehub wallet to my cold address Gatehub warns me that I'm sending to an address that doesn't belong to me. Should I be concerned about this? Thanks for any help. Cheers, Trippy
  21. So I finally took the plunge and used @Twarden's guide to generating a cold wallet with jatchili's minimalist client. I generated the key pair on a computer with no internet connection, and sent a test amount to make sure it showed up correctly. Having observed that the test was successful, I sent most of my XRP to the address, saved the address/secret on multiple external devices (paper and digital storage) and locked them safely in multiple locations. Here's where my question comes in. My logical, yet non-technical mind started to wonder how a key pair generated offline could be: Unique. Meaning how does ripple-lib prevent a collision when the secret is generated offline? Known. When I want to access my XRP with the secret, how does RCL know that's the right secret if the computer it was generated on will never connect to the internet and therefore will never talk to the ledger. @nikb You're the perfect person to answer this (and you were just in the chat) so I'll tag you in if you're up for it. If anyone is interested in the cold wallet guide I used, I linked to it below. It was very simple follow.
  22. So after a while I have wanted to create a new cold wallet (like in the clip above). But now I can't seem to find one on Ripple.com?
  23. Create a hot-wallet: From a computer you trust with an internet connection, go to https://jatchili.github.io/minimalist-ripple-client/ and click generate identity, you will be notified to save your secret key before exiting the window. Click on show/hide secret and then back up your secret on two separate pieces of paper an save them both in safe places (i.e. one in your wallet and one in another location besides your home like a safety deposit box). Save your ripple address on your computer via copying and pasting it into a text file, a bookmark, draft email, or whatever else you prefer. Fund the wallet with 25 XRP to activate the account, once this is done, you can begin to build trust-lines to Gateways. Create a cold-wallet: From a computer that you trust with an internet connection you trust, go to https://raw.githubusercontent.com/jatchili/minimalist-ripple-client/master/index.html and download the latest release of the minimalist client as index.html on a clean USB drive. Eject the removable media and connect it to a standalone PC. Open the index.html file with Chrome or Firefox and click the generate identity button, you will be notified to save your secret key before exiting the window. Click on show/hide secret and then back up your secret on two separate pieces of paper an save them both in safe places (i.e. one in your wallet and one in another location besides your home like a safety deposit box). Save your ripple address on your computer via copying and pasting it into a text file, a bookmark, draft email, or whatever else you prefer. From another computer with internet access, fund the wallet with at least 25 XRP to activate it, once this is done, your cold wallet has been created. Keep your two copies of your secret key safe, it is the only way to access this cold wallet's funds when you will want to spend them in the future. To regain access to your cold wallet: From you computer that you trust with an internet connection you trust, go to https://jatchili.github.io/minimalist-ripple-client/ and enter your secret then press set identity. When you click set identity, your public key will be displayed. Click connect to ripple and you will receive a response within another window. You can now query the balance of your cold wallet, trade, and send funds.
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