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Panzer_Kitteh

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About Panzer_Kitteh

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  1. Why don't people use a clean Linux or Windows machine when doing anything financial or has confidential information on it? I have a laptop with Linux Mint I use for finances and another one for not-so-important-things like looking at cat videos, shopping on eBay or Amazon and viewing Pornhub videos.
  2. I could only find the Google Chrome Web Store Developer Agreement, but I would assume that particular user agreement would have similar if not a broader limitation of liability language within in it, to include, among other things, arbitration.
  3. As someone that works in the corporate world, there is confidentiality agreements that prevents a party to a company from disclosing such information (i.e. benefits), and if there was litigation, it would be protected by an Order or not filed with the court. Lastly, these things are followed-up via a settlement agreement, which has more of what can't be disclosed to any party that is outside of regulatory body. So again, how is it possible for you to get such information and where did you get such information from?
  4. Unsubstantiated claim there. Would you like to cite the source for this?
  5. I get one infraction for being "abusive" (not sure what I said that was abusive) and I'm sure the mod won't see this as abusive behavior because you're a Gold Member.
  6. If you have a lot of liquidity it doesn't matter what the price is. It tends to move a lot slower. If there is low liquidity, you can pump and dumb that stock to make a quick buck if you have enough cash or enough people you can organize to do that at the same time. But that gets into ethical territory for me to artificially inflate the price so others FOMO in as you sell.
  7. I think you meant to say it's easier to manipulate when the liquidity gets lower.
  8. Personally I'm waiting for MGI (yes, not directly related to this conversation) to get to $1.00 or less, buy, and sell once it increases in value by at least $2.00.
  9. I see the approach you're trying to make with this analogy, but it's not a good one. Is the implied warranty of a bottle opener to make someone an ROI or to simply be used as a tool to open a bottle so you can drink from it?
  10. The problem is, legal jurisprudence would ask is Ripple Labs, Inc. in the care, custody and control of XRP? I'm not sure I have enough evidence yet to say yes or no, but it doesn't really matter what my opinion is or yours, because I and you would be making an opinion reserved for a Judge and/or jury, or by a regulatory commission, or via case law, or state or federal statutes, to decide upon.
  11. Do you really think MGI would have used their own capital on something they might not have initially been all in on or not quite understood the benefits of, if any? This is where Ripple saw the potential to incentivize MGI's adoption via contribution as 10 percent owner. They knew MGI need cash and used their weakness in the market as a leveraging tool. Furthermore, MGI can't arbitrarily decide on anything without first obtaining board approval from their members (controlling members) via the Operational Agreement (or whatever the name of that particular agreement is by and between the members).
  12. I would suggest reading about preferred and common stocks. That will help answer your question. Please, get out of the mindset of a company looking to sell at X price like a day trader in his 40s does from his apartment. A company does this for dividends, ROI, building its ownership stake, PR/marketing, leverage and other reasons.
  13. It's more than "classification" because it could be tax exempt or a tax credit (federal, state or local) can be applied for MGI or even Ripple if it's related to R&D. https://www.alliantgroup.com/services/r-d-tax-credit-2/
  14. I finally got the HTML file to work on EDGARS. Ripple Labs, Inc. purchased 6,237,523 shares of common stock at $4.10 on 11/22/19 (see Table 1 and Table 2 of Form 4). EDGARS https://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/data/1273931/000120919119058039/xslF345X03/doc4.xml
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