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VanGogh

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  1. Pound Sand! It simply shows that if XRP is successful then the potential for price increase is extremely likely. Complex descriptions with all the intricacies defeat the purpose of simple illustrations.
  2. Sourced from @BANKXRP https://www.systems.cs.cornell.edu/docs/fincen-cvc-guidance-final.pdf
  3. That same Democrat will be the one who claims to have invented cryptocurrencies after it succeeds!
  4. He had the ducks on here for a short period of time, then removed them: https://twitter.com/321yugelbaraeb The Bearable Bull recently did a youtube video detailing many of the correct predictions Bearableguy321 has had.
  5. From Bearableguy321: Go ahead all of you, hate me for posting it! He's been right a lot more than people give him credit for. He posted the sun rays too before Fidelity's recent announcement. I love it, personally. Get your green ducks in a row!
  6. 100 Billion XRP / 8 Billion people = 12.5 XRP per person. Once this ramps up fully there will not be enough XRP. If XRP is successful in becoming the world's primary bridge token then surely it will also be used as a currency to some degree. That is where 12.5 XRP for every man, woman and child will not be nearly enough. The lack of supply will bring the price up until and beyond enabling the divisibility of each XRP playing a real roll in its daily use.
  7. I like it. As @LordVetinari said this one is targeting a newly opened corridor. But also, I would like it even as general exposure. I remember not too long ago seeing ads for PayPal before it was who they are today. And later adds for Square. I had no idea what they were, but the repetition paid off. I use them both today regularly. Ripple is making themselves known in industry and soon households. XRP will follow.
  8. "Gradually, and then suddenly" --Ernest Hemingway, "The Sun Also Rises" speaking of bankruptcy; the same applies in this scenario discussed previously.
  9. I agree. I have a feeling they are also going to shake the tree loose of weak hands on the way up as hard—if not harder—than they did on the way down. These pull backs could be violent. I do not plan to try and play it on the way up. I just plan to hold. I'm sure it will stressful as intended.
  10. Couldn't agree more, and I think we'll do just fine. My point is that we are likely not what the SEC defines as "reasonable purchasers". We're the bold and crazy ones who helped make the market possible to begin with.
  11. It seems to me "we" are anything but "reasonable purchaser(s)". We are early adopters, nuts, fanatics—anything but reasonable! Bankers, people looking to remit money overseas, are reasonable purchasers using XRP for its intended purpose.
  12. https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2019/04/02/andreessen-horowitz-is-blowing-up-the-venture-capital-model-again/#c7866207d9fa "Why? Well, venture capitalists have long traded a lack of Wall Street-style oversight for the promise that they invest mainly in new shares of private companies. It was a tradeoff firms gladly made—until the age of crypto, a type of high-risk investment the SEC says requires more oversight. So be it, says Andreessen Horowitz. By renouncing its venture capital status, it’ll be able to go deeper on riskier bets: If the firm wants to put $1 billion into cryptocurrency or tokens, or buy unlimited shares in public companies or from other investors, it can. And in doing so, the thinking goes, it’ll again make other firms feel like they have one hand tied behind their back." https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2019/04/02/andreessen-horowitz-is-blowing-up-the-venture-capital-model-again/#15c13d6f7d9f My own thinking: If you had some high-dollar, exclusive clients and saw the writing on the wall that crypto is going to be huge, wouldn't you want to help them "get-in" before everyone else? If you did it on a private basis, as a new and separate entity from your brokerage wouldn't you avoid having to wait for regulations to approve an ETF? Imagine the FOMO in this scenario. These hedge-funds, they only cooperate for so long—they have to be trying to figure out how to beat each other to the market. Sourced from :
  13. "Wow. Andreessen Horowitz is registering their entire firm of 150 people as financial advisors in order to make bigger bets." "Why? Well, venture capitalists have long traded a lack of Wall Street-style oversight for the promise that they invest mainly in new shares of private companies. It was a tradeoff firms gladly made—until the age of crypto, a type of high-risk investment the SEC says requires more oversight. So be it, says Andreessen Horowitz. By renouncing its venture capital status, it’ll be able to go deeper on riskier bets: If the firm wants to put $1 billion into cryptocurrency or tokens, or buy unlimited shares in public companies or from other investors, it can. And in doing so, the thinking goes, it’ll again make other firms feel like they have one hand tied behind their back." https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2019/04/02/andreessen-horowitz-is-blowing-up-the-venture-capital-model-again/#15c13d6f7d9f My own thinking: If you had some high-dollar, exclusive clients and saw the writing on the wall that crypto is going to be huge, wouldn't you want to help them "get-in" before everyone else? If you did it on a private basis, as a new and separate entity from your brokerage wouldn't you avoid having to wait for regulations to approve an ETF? Imagine the FOMO in this scenario. These hedge-funds, they only cooperate for so long—they have to be trying to figure out how to beat each other to the market.
  14. Then extrapolate this to the idea that ETFs will become a reality this year, where hedge-funds can invest a percentage of the trillions they have at their disposal in the form of retirement funds.
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