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T8493

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Everything posted by T8493

  1. Did you click the refresh button?
  2. What do you mean by "XRP never made it to Nano S"? XRPs are in your Ripple account.
  3. Check if your account balance on Ripple ledger is correct.
  4. @yellowsubmarine, what you don't get is that there are different levels of contractual requirements and business models. Do you want some guarantees? Well, you can have them, but you'll have to pay for them. Do you want some clauses regarding liability of developers? Well, you can have them, but you'll have to pay. DO you want software that is tested on all different platforms? Well, you can have it, but you'll have to pay.
  5. If banks had such extremely high standards, then they wouldn't use any third-party software or vendor.... But hey, they still use AWS, Apache Struts, PGP, closed source buggy hardware firmware on their routers, Microsoft Windows.....
  6. The same reasoning can be used for lower layers: third-party library: "Hey, this is the result of some computation that I made". Ripple-Lib: "OK" You can't go after Jatchili either....
  7. All software companies could have big problems if this can of worms is opened, not just Ripple. That's why nobody will bother to "refund" you unless you can prove on the court that they're liable despite their license terms stating otherwise.
  8. You have a hierarchy of different components here: wallet ---> RippleAPI --> third-party library ---> Safari browser The actual bug happened somewhere in the lower levels of this hierarchy. But yet you somehow without a doubt demand that Ripple should refund you something. However, the same reasoning could be used to demand refund from the author of the wallet. (I'm ignoring the fact that liability is explicitly excluded in all components of this software stack).
  9. No, why would they refund anything if they're not liable? Amount is not a problem per se. The main problem is that they open a can of worms if they start "refunding" their "customers". Why don't you demand refund from the author of third-party (not Ripple) library that was supposedly buggy? Or maybe from Apple because they released a supposedly buggy browser?
  10. All software that I've seen so far comes with such license terms. However, there are cyber/liability insurance policies and audits that can be used to mitigate such risks. Take a look at what e.g. Amazon AWS guarantees you. Basically nothing. But banks, Netflix, Instagram, etc. still use it.
  11. If you see yourself as a customer of Ripple, then I also assume that you agreed to their "terms of service" ("IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, DIRECT, INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES.....")
  12. Companies that release open-source (or even closed source) software usually don't indemnify customer's losses. Have you ever heard of Apache software foundation paying someone because they had bugs in their code? Or Microsoft reimbursing people who were victims of ransomware attackers (Petya) exploiting bugs in their operating system? I think you're confusing two different business models and their legal implications.
  13. What kind of response do you want? Ripple "fixed" this bug long ago (AFAIK it probably wasn't a bug in their library, the bug (or at least code that didn't return correct results in Safari browser) was in one of third-party libraries that Ripple-lib uses) by updating the references to third-party libraries.
  14. It is not about "working around bugs in their code". It is about "separation of concerns". Low-level function shouldn't be responsible for checking their result, especially if checking this results means that have to use other methods that are not directly relevant (e.g. if you want to check whether generated secret key works, you need to create another transaction, serialize it, sign it and then verify this signature). You need to solve this problem at higher levels where you also know how to handle this problem if it arises.
  15. It is not clear whether it is a bug in ripple-lib and not in browser. Jatchilli's wallet could be "prudent" and check whether it can sign transactions with generated secret key.
  16. I guess you somehow don't grasp the idea of free and open-source software. You somehow assume that you as a "customer" have some extra rights or something. If authors of such software could be successfully sued for any damage because of bugs, then probably no one would release any software for free and under an open-source license. Equifax was hacked because of a bug in Apache Struts. Did Equifax sue Apache Software Foundation? I'm not claiming everything was ok. But using a wallet that wasn't maintained for years (Jatchilli's wallet) and didn't have enough test coverage, should somehow raise some big red flags.
  17. Please read the license that accompanies this software that you used. It is a standard license and I think there is some case law, I think. It is also not a common practice in software to do the same cryptographic operation twice just to check whether you got the correct result (at least not in production code). But why don't you sue e.g. Apple for not implementing their browser correctly? Users could (and should) do "due diligence" for themselves and check whether they can actually sign and submit transactions. I did this and many other people on this forum did this, too.
  18. Why do you assume that "faith in Ripple" is based on one three day conference?
  19. Generally speaking, for EC discrete logarithm problems (EC public key->private key) the most efficient general method is not "guess and check" but rather a Pollard's Rho (and maybe Lambda) algorithm.
  20. Variable xrpreserveamount gets assigned or not? It is unclear what you mean by " the app just loads forever" (why it shouldn't "load forever"? You don't exit the process or something like that). It is also not clear how you run this app (in nodejs?). You need to be more specific if you want some help. However, I doubt many people here have experience with anything related to RippleAPI outside of the context of nodejs and browser.
  21. If your node is connected to the testnet network, then yes. See documentation: https://ripple.com/build/rippled-apis/#sign-and-submit-mode
  22. You can manually create JSON transaction and submit it or use one of the desktop clients, etc. This is just ordinary account on test net. There's nothing special about it. Just use the same tool as you would use for your "real" testnet account.
  23. Just send them to your second account on test net. It is not clear what you mean by "testnet wallet i am running in my stock node". You don't run your wallet in a node, but on a network.
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