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zerpdigger

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Posts posted by zerpdigger


  1. On 7/13/2019 at 4:33 PM, Hodor said:

    Jeremy Light will be attending PayExpo for Ripple

    just a quick comment -- for me, jeremy light is a VIP for ripple, an excellent acquisition 

    been following him on linkedin for years and he really knows his sh*t and highly respected within fintech/banking 


  2. that *IS* suspiciously like the narrative coming form ripple! plus the MG reference really makes you wonder 

    and brad confirmed in his twitter rant that he'd spoken to mnuchin, so... my guess is he coached him a little on crypto assets 

    add to that whenever the big boys n gals talk about crypto assets, xrp is curiously missing, to a point where it's very fishy


  3. 1 hour ago, JannaOneTrick said:

    @TheCryptHawk (Tweeter handle)

    suspected fraud and known liar -- avoid

    and NO he didn't "predict" the moneygram announcement, someone else did and he took credit for it, like he steals others charts and runs sketchy paid groups 

    xrp community is particularly gullible so be on guard against these hype artists and their nonsense 


  4. thanks -- very interesting hardline stance from the financial times:

    Quote

    Broadly, they note, there is a lack of reliable valuation models, which contrasts with other high-risk assets where at least some sort of credible valuation can be resorted to. 

    To test the seriousness of this valuation issue, the FCA referred to bitcoin valuations by two different analysts using the same pricing model. As they note, these two analysts arrived at bitcoin valuations with a 400x difference.

    https---d1e00ek4ebabms.cloudfront.net-production-e040e3d0-869f-4cd6-b6d6-b8c9818c007b_FINAL.thumb.png.e877d65d02cd1152c5aa9da68162d956.png

    As they noted about the discrepancy:

    "Even if the supply of one such exchange token is genuinely limited, the supply of others is potentially infinite and they are substitutable, implying that the value of any single such currency will fall to zero over time."

    Total utter madness, in other words.

    From our perspective, the ban doesn't necessarily go far enough. If one takes the concept of a derivative in its purest sense, the ban should also be applicable to wallet services and exchange services that issue their own crypto-linked liabilities to punters instead of offering fully key-controlled ownership of the underlying. 

    If you're going to invest in the supposedly positive "be your own bank" features of crypto, you should "be your own bank" and not hypocritically use third-party intermediaries for your exposure.

    :bomb:


  5. 9 minutes ago, VanGogh said:

    Absolutely, bacon is priceless. I like that for sure! :) My point is really that fiat has been abused over and over throughout its history. It's not as stable as perceived; i.e. Venezuela today where you now need a wheel burrow to purchase that bacon if there were any bacon there to purchase. I'm sure I'm not telling you anything you don't already know in that the invention of crypto was in part to reduce government's ability to devalue our hard-earned money. It's slight-of-hand because most people only see prices of goods rise and fall rather than the value of their dollar rise or fall, even though it is in comparison—steadily decreasing in purchasing power. One of the reasons I'm buying crypto is because in the longer view I believe it will be more stable than fiat is, even more than the US dollar is today and will be so on a world-wide scale.

    i suppose ultimately it comes down to whether you believe government control of the money supply is a net positive or net negative; whether you think we need to socialise certain aspects of money e.g. to cover unemployed, healthcare, military & national security, etc, or whether you reckon a libertarian/privatized money system would work and not be subjective to manipulation, foreign influence, and instability etc as well 

    i am personally of the first view; that money is more complex than the libertarian/austrian thesis, and that the latter would end up with the very robber baron / russian oligarch / international terrorism / inflation / deflation / stagnation / hoarding (etc) issues that fiat was designed to actually prevent 

    of course, even if you're anti-govt and anti-central-bank, you can still see the difference between a responsible nation/economy (USA, UK, etc) and an irresponsible one like venezuela et al 

    or maybe we should just price everything in #bacon... imagine bacon micropayments... 


  6. 50 minutes ago, VanGogh said:

    Yesterday I was at the grocery store and the cost of bacon had doubled in terms of the USD. Hmmm! Rent, and the cost of housing in terms of the USD (in the US) has not exactly been very stable either. 

    you're probably confusing commodity prices with the fluctuation of currency 

    but even if what you say is true, that just strengthens the argument that it's best to always price goods in a more stable (fiat) currency than a crypto where your bacon could be worth 1 dogecoin on monday and 100 doge by friday :D 

    (i mean, frankly, bacon is PRICELESS but you know...)

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