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  1. You can now delegate your SGB to an FTSO signal provider, and it seems like the rewards are likely to come online pretty soon (remember the network is still in observation mode until the 27th). This means you will be wanting to delegate your SGB to get those sweet rewards. (NB If all this stuff like FTSO and signal provider is unknown to you then feel free to come by the flare discussion group, we have some info and knowledgeable people who will easily answer your questions) This website has a list of signal providers and how much is currently delegated to them, fees, etc. This is very similar to any other PoS network if you have used that. https://flaremetrics.io/ftso At the moment, because there are no rewards, it is impossible to say which signal provider is 'better' or will get you more rewards. That remains to be seen. Having said that, I do want to put in a plug for @FTSO_AU. They have been engaged on this board in the Flare Discussion Group with us from the beginning, answering questions, giving us some info about what's happening on the backend, and in general being very supportive of us on this forum. I don't want to be a shill and I'm sure it is not encouraged at all here, but I think given that FTSO AU has been an active contributor to this forum I think it's OK to say thanks and encourage others to say thanks too. I personally have FTSO AU on my list of signal providers that I am currently delegating to, they are 3rd on the list so a fair number of other people are making the same choice. Anyway as I said at this moment right now it doesn't really matter who you delegate to, but nonetheless I like to be generous to people who have been generous to us.
    12 points
  2. XRP isn't a security. Garlinghouse's job isn't to represent XRP holders' interests. I wouldn't expected him to know details like that. I didn't even know how many people Deaton is represented and I'm one of them.
    11 points
  3. Woodseal

    OMG must read

    Pat Toomeys letter to Gensler https://www.banking.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/toomey_letter_to_gensler_on_crypto_regulation.pdf
    9 points
  4. How to earn rewards and delegate your Songbird (SGB) tokens in the Bifrost Wallet? Bifrost Wallet is a non-custodial software wallet, that provides you with a secure and easy way to manage your crypto assets on an Android or iOS device. Bifrost Wallet currently supports Ethereum (ETH), Songbird (SGB), XRP (XRP) as well as various ERC20 tokens. A visual step-by-step guide on how to delegate and earn passive income in Bifrost wallet: https://stedas.hr/how-delegate-sgb-bifrost-wallet.html Bonus: glossary of terms + FAQ
    9 points
  5. So basically what Lubin is telling us, is they're muggin off millions of users with a product they designed to fail. And SEC gave them the license to use this ruse to rip off the public, whilst holding back Ripple. These people are thugs
    8 points
  6. Everything you need to know about Songbird (SGB) 100+ data, facts and details about SGB https://www.stedas.hr/everything-to-know-about-songbird.html https://www.stedas.hr/spark-airdrop-for-xrp-holders.html
    7 points
  7. I'm betting that cryptocurrencies outlast Gary Gensler.
    7 points
  8. Bitcoin is still looking to settle out. Never.
    7 points
  9. It will pass. That will set the goal post far off on the detrimental side of things. Then there will be a multi year fight to set another goal post as far as possible on the beneficial side of things. Then the weirdos in DC will play "let's argue about it", and eventually they will be forced to do what is best to preserve America's best strength... global dominance of the monetary infrastructure. That or we can just let China become the global reserve currency. I'm standing by, waiting to see if I need to go ahead and move somewhere else that has laws. That, or I will have to work remote and never bring my XRP into the US, so there goes the cap gains tax revenue for the US govt. I'm lucky in that I'm in a situation where I can go anywhere and do anything at anytime, but I want to get going and all this wishy washy BS isn't floating my boat. I'd prefer to stay in the US, but Damn it's becoming harder as time ticks, and I've traveled a lot, so I love other countries & cultures. Just not sure what to do.
    7 points
  10. Our public beta is open ... see details below. Let us know what you think when you've had a chance to use it. Direct link is https://app.ftso.com.au or access it from the Delegate button on the homepage.
    6 points
  11. I've thought about making a video about this but will broach the subject here. Regarding China and the future of Monetary infrastructure geopolitics.... The key point is that currently the US/west's banks dominate the global Monetary infrastructure, and the way that XRPL'S UNL cryptography works, it creates a network topology that retains & extends this US/west's monetary dominance over time. PoW cryptography which allows anyone with the most mining rigs to gain superiority. Nation-state actors can afford to dominate if they make it a priority. Which creates a "the guy with the most money wins by default" type of situation. I'm not sure the SEC and Congress realize what's at stake here. Seems they are listening to the big money center banking lobby, who are hoping to delay the changeing of the current monetary infrastructure's topology, which they currently sit profitably in the middle of. It's like newspapers fighting the internet with lobbyists. It's a losing battle, "if you can't beat em, join em". Which is best for extending their own position in the topology further into the future, so it's even in their own best interest to adopt XRPL to retain their privilaged position by becoming part of the UNL. Somebody needs to make this fact well known to these regulators & politicians. Time is ticking. It's not a joking matter.
    6 points
  12. The Ethereum Free Pass, Fair Notice and the Fight Ahead https://www.crypto-law.us/the-ethereum-free-pass-fair-notice-and-the-fight-ahead/ By John E. Deaton, Founder and Host, CryptoLaw. I believe we have reached a turning point in the fight against the Securities and Exchange Commission’s unfair and abusive treatment of XRP holders in its lawsuit against Ripple. So much evidence has come out in this case that exposes the outrageous actions of the SEC and the key figures behind the lawsuit, that I felt it was important to send you a complete summary of what has happened, why it’s important, and what I and 20,000 XRP holders are doing in this fight. It is a story of an overreaching regulator unfairly picking winners and losers in the blockchain business space, a web of insider connections and conflicts of interest, and thousands of retail investors who were egregiously harmed by the federal agency that is supposed to be protecting them. The Key Players: First, it is important to remind everyone of the key figures in this story. Jay Clayton was a longtime partner at the law firm of Sullivan & Cromwell, where he notably co-engineered the Alibaba IPO in 2014. Alibaba owns Alipay, the Chinese payments service that was designed to directly compete with western fintech innovations using blockchain. Alipay has moved into cross-border remittances which is Ripple’s primary use case for XRP. When he was nominated to be SEC Chairman in 2017, he was dubbed “the most conflicted SEC Chairman in history” in an article that ran down his baggage of potential conflicts in the job. At his nomination hearing, he was reminded (and conceded) that if any matter related to a client of his from Sullivan & Cromwell came before the SEC, he would be barred from voting. William Hinman was a longtime partner at the firm of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, and co-engineered the Alibaba IPO with Jay Clayton. Hinman “retired” from Simpson Thacher to join the SEC as Clayton’s Director of Corporation Finance. Ethereum was launched by the Ethereum Foundation in 2014 as an enterprise blockchain system, and its native currency, ether, was issued in an ICO to “anyone who wants to purchase” it. An early investor and co-founder was Joe Lubin. In parallel, Lubin founded ConsenSys, a for-profit consulting firm to promote and profit from building enterprise blockchain solutions exclusively on the Ethereum network. Lubin received 9.5% of ether. For reference, a $10,000 investment in the ether ICO and held to this day is worth more than $120 million. Thus, you can imagine Lubin and anyone else’s financial interest in ether. ConsenSys is a client of Sullivan & Cromwell (Clayton). The Enterprise Ethereum Alliance, a coalition of companies built to market Ethereum as an enterprise solution, includes Simpson Thacher & Bartlett (Hinman). This is how Clayton, Hinman and Lubin were connected as this story began. The “free pass” for Ethereum’s cryptocurrency, ether: Papers filed in court and public statements on video from Lubin, Hinman and others linked to ConsenSys reveal that multiple meetings between ConsenSys and senior SEC officials were held in 2017 and 2018 to lobby the agency to give the ether token a regulatory “free pass”. In Hinman’s deposition (taken in July by Ripple’s legal team), it is clear that Hinman directed his staff to set up a meeting with Lubin and Consensys on December 13, 2017. It should not be lost on you that the SEC was investigating and prosecuting dozens of ICOs that orchestrated crowd-fundraising exactly the way Lubin and Ethereum did (i.e., anyone could buy pre-mined ether tokens and their funds were used to build the blockchain). In fact, many people refer to the period as the “2017 ICO craze”. The SEC actually sued a company called Telegram and achieved a preliminary injunction that prevented the development of its blockchain for conducting an ICO substantially similar to ether’s. At the time of this December 13, 2017 meeting, Ripple was not under investigation and XRP had been publicly sold and traded for over 4 years. XRP was also battling ether for the number 2 cryptocurrency by market cap behind bitcoin. A key meeting was organized on March 28, 2018, by Andreessen Horowitz, where Ethereum investors presented a proposal for a regulatory free pass for ether. I have reviewed that “safe harbor” proposal thoroughly, and the only digital asset it even mentions is ether. Furthermore, key elements of the document were incorporated directly into Hinman’s speech saying that ether is no longer a security. In essence, Hinman’s speech was suggested by and partly written by some of Ethereum’s top investors. We know that Lubin and Consensys met with the SEC at least three more times before Hinman’s June 14, 2018, speech where he declared that, “putting aside the fundraising” conducted by Ethereum with its token, ether is not a security and therefore not subject to SEC regulation. ConsenSys has been battling to gain market share om the cross-border payments market for Ethereum, competing directly with Ripple’s cross-border payments solution on the XRP ledger. After Hinman’s speech, Lubin publicly predicted that Ethereum would be the only enterprise platform to get a free pass from the SEC, and that “a reckoning is coming” for others — specifically Ripple. Mike Novogratz, Lubin’s college roommate and a major investor in ether, predicted just nine days before the speech that he would “bet dollars to donuts” that the SEC would declare ether to not be a security. If you know Mike Novogratz, he cares deeply about his public perception and credibility and he would not go out on a limb and guarantee what the SEC was going to say unless he was assured of it from someone with personal knowledge. Novogratz, like Lubin, predicted that the SEC was going to select one token and its promoters and go after them to shut them dowm as an example. Shortly after Lubin and Novogratz’s public predictions, we now know that Ripple was notified of an informal investigation. Meanwhile, while Lubin and ConsenSys were holdings meetings with the SEC, future SEC Chairman Gary Gensler told an MIT audience that he didn’t see enough regulatory clarity in the market for digital assets, and said “even Ripple” needed clarity. The Ripple Lawsuit: The XRP cryptocurrency was never issued in an ICO, operates on a fully decentralized ledger and has been used by project developers and consumers with no connection to Ripple for years. XRP fits the criteria of Hinman’s 2018 speech better than ether does. In fact, Ripple controls less than 4% of the validators on the XRP Ledger. Ripple once objected to a change on the ledger but was overruled by the majority of validators. The point is that the XRP network is arguably more decentralized that the ether network. The Ripple lawsuit was filed on Clayton’s last full day at the SEC in 2020. The timing was very curious. About two weeks before Clayton directed the suit be filed against Ripple, former SEC Commissioner Joseph Grundfest sent a letter to Clayton stating that he should not file the lawsuit as he was leaving the SEC. Grundfest argued that no exigency existed to file considering that XRP had been traded for over 7 years. Grundfest informed Clayton that the SEC could not make any material distinction between XRP and ether and if he filed the case it would call into question the SEC’s exercise of discretion. He also warned Clayton that the mere filing of the lawsuit would cause unprecedented billions of losses to individual investors with no connection to Ripple. When the suit was filed, XRP lost $15 billion in market cap. (It should be noted that Grundfest was retained by Ripple. It doesn’t change what he said being true.) It’s also important to note that Clayton was the deciding vote to sue Ripple, on the 5-member commission. He chose to bring the most consequential enforcement action since the 1946 Supreme Court decision on Howey against Ripple, a direct competitor of his former law firm’s client, ConsenSys. When challenged in court by Ripple’s legal team on the contradiction between Hinman’s speech and the SEC’s actions, the SEC has attempted to disown Hinman’s speech as market guidance or a determination by the SEC, claiming it was just his personal opinion and irrelevant to the case. In fact, the SEC had Hinman sign an affidavit that his speech was “only” his personal opinion and not that of the SEC. This flimsy argument is now being torn apart by Ripple’s legal team, which has launched a “fair notice and due process” defense that could decide the case in summary judgment and possibly set a sweeping precedent that limits the SEC’s power to regulate cryptocurrencies. All available evidence indicates that Hinman’s speech was intended as market guidance by everyone at the SEC; it was believed to be market guidance by Lubin, Ethereum Foundation and ConsenSys, and taken as market guidance by the media and investors. Multiple documents issued by SEC legal staff reference on other matters reference the Hinman speech as representing a “recognition” of Ethereum and ether by “the Commission”. The SEC has also admitted in court that no investigation was ever opened against ether. This means the agency never considered enforcement action against Ethereum despite its 2014 ICO and the Ethereum Foundation’s large-scale sales to speculators, like to Novogratz. To date, ether is still the only altcoin in the market that the SEC has affirmatively anointed as a currency or commodity and not a security, even though it’s now trying to pretend it never anointed it, and Chairman Gensler is trying to pretend he never said in 2018 that Ripple deserved regulatory clarity. Why did Ethereum get a free pass and Ripple get sued? The “fair notice” defense in the Ripple case has led to this embarrassing question for the SEC. Here are some key observations: The SEC has taken a well-deserved battering in court since it filed the Ripple lawsuit, and it raises another question: why file such flawed case that could ultimately backfire so badly and set a sweeping precedent limiting the agency’s power? Despite the SEC fighting tooth-and-nail to stop it, Ripple was granted the right to depose Hinman and now they are battling to get SEC documents showing who drafted, edited and saw the Hinman speech in advance. Those discovery documents revealed the speech was attached to 63 emails in the drafting phase, but the SEC refuses to disclose who was on them. Discovery also revealed that Hinman only provided a draft to Clayton and no other commissioner. This means Commissioner Hester Peirce, a.k.a. “Crypto Mom”, was not allowed to give input. The last official meeting between the SEC and Lubin and Consensys before the speech, was June 8, 2018. And thanks to the investigative work of the XRP Army on social media, I have obtained a copy of the March 2018 Andreessen Horowitz investor group memo to Hinman, advocating for a specific free pass for ether. We have proof that Hinman used the investors’ memo as the basis of his speech. The Ripple lawsuit, filed on Clayton’s last day, has slowed Ripple’s interbank payments business and given ConsenSys an opening to try to pull ahead. Two months before the Ripple lawsuit was filed, Clayton’s firm of Sullivan & Cromwell assisted ConsenSys to acquire the Quorum interbank payments platform. And it has brought a lot of scrutiny to the web of personal financial interests tied up between Clayton, Hinman, Lubin and the Hinman speech. Here is what we’ve documented: Almost immediately after leaving the SEC, Clayton was hired by One River Digital Asset Management, a crypto hedge fund that “quietly” made a huge financial bet exclusively on bitcoin and ether starting shortly before the Ripple lawsuit was filed. What a coincidence. Less than a month after filing the Ripple lawsuit, SEC Enforcement Director Marc Berger left the agency to join Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, of the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. What a coincidence. From 2017 to 2020 – the same years he served at the SEC – Hinman received over $15 million in payments from Simpson, Thacher & Bartlett. What a coincidence. Immediately after leaving the SEC, Hinmanreturned to Simpson Thacher & Bartlett. He also was named senior advisor to a new $2 billion crypto fund at Andreessen Horowitz. What a coincidence. My Role and Why I’m Doing This: I am not here to defend the company Ripple in any manner. Ripple’s legal team is as impressive as it can be. Ripple has former SEC Chair Mary Jo White as counsel, along with a former Director of Enforcement and a former Director of Corporation Finance on its team. The truth is that all of these cryptos start out as a security in the first few years. Arguably, bitcoin is the only crypto asset not to originate a security. But even bitcoin was sometimes considered a security by the SEC in 2014 and 2015. I now represent 20,000 XRP holders who were harmed by the SEC’s lawsuit against Ripple. I got involved in this from the very beginning. The SEC filed the case on December 22, 2020. When I read the Complaint I knew that this case was NOT about securities laws but about something very different. I acted immediately. Nine days later, on January 1, 2021, I filed a Writ of Mandamus against the SEC in Rhode Island Federal Court, asking for the Court to order the SEC to amend its Complaint. Specifically, I wanted the SEC to exclude characterizing as unregistered securities the XRP held by my clients that were purchased in the secondary market from Coinbase and other exchanges and not from Ripple. Many of my clients had never heard of Ripple until the lawsuit. It is difficult to enter into a common enterprise and rely on the efforts of someone you’ve never heard of. The SEC objected to my Writ of Mandamus and stated that only the Southern District Court of New York – where Ripple lawsuit was filed – could hear any matter related to XRP. I immediately withdrew my Writ and filed a motion to intervene as a defendant in the SEC case against Ripple. The motion has been fully briefed and we are waiting for a decision. If the SEC had limited its claims against Ripple to early specific distributions of XRP, I would have never filed anything. But, for the first time in SEC history in a non-ICO setting, the SEC is claiming that all XRP, even the XRP purchased by people in the secondary market with no connection with Ripple, are unregistered securities. The SEC is claiming this 8 years after it allowed XRP to be publicly traded and after it allowed Ripple to purchase a minority stake in MoneyGram knowing XRP would be utilized. After approving that acquisition, the SEC is now claiming that the XRP distributed by Ripple to MoneyGram, that MoneyGram sold to Coinbase, and that Coinbase sold to me, or you, are all unregistered securities. It’s madness. As far as my role or potential bias in this case, I am not being paid for my efforts and I have used my own money to fund the intervention. I have no connection to Ripple or its attorneys. If I have a bias, it’s a free-market, libertarian bias. Plus, if one looks at the stories I’ve read of people’s life savings being wiped out because of the SEC’s actions, you will understand why I’m doing this as well. If someone gets harmed because they made a bad investment that’s fine. But it shouldn’t be because government officials are picking the winners and the losers in an environment where there is no regulatory clarity at all. With all these facts as our greatest strength, along with our numbers, we will fight to the end.
    6 points
  13. The problem with the era of wildcat banking in the 1800s was it was private. GG fails to recognize that the fiat experiment we began in the 1970's is as destined to fail as every other similar attempt in history. Distributed ledger technology provides for a public, government-agnostic currency whose inflation/deflation can't be altered by political whim. GG's inability to appropriately synthesize the history of money is only matched by his inability to envision DLTs future.
    6 points
  14. It takes two to settle. I think the SEC wanted to settle from day one if they got paid enough. Then that stupid Ripple took the bait, swam away, took the fishing rod with m and the SEC till this day is trying to find it to unhook the fish and catch a dumber one. If Ripple gets what it wants they can settle. I don't believe in the "Ripple wants to save not only XRP but every asset on the world!!". If they get what they want they are the first who actually have clarity and the rest can fight for their own clearance. Imagine what that position would do with both the company and the asset.
    6 points
  15. It also looks like Ripple is expanding its China operations: What I find strange is that Ripple has had boots on the ground in China (Li Yuan – Ripple’s Managing Director for China) going back to the end of 2019 and most likely some time before that. However, the company has been eerily quiet regarding its China operation/developments. By now, I would've expected Ripple to have China listed as one of their global offices and given a similar showcase announcement for Li Yuan, as the company's Managing Director, like they did for Brooks Entwistle and Sandi Young, but not a peep. Matter-of-fact, the only China related partnership that Ripple gave a full-throated announcement was for the LianLian Pay partnership back in 2018. Thanks to@LeonidasH, he was able to do some digging and found some interesting Ripple/China/Malaysia connections a year ago. I think Ripple has something BIG brewing in China. @LeonidasH mentions Ripple’s collaboration/MOU with China’s Asia Pacific Investment Bank (APIB), the Nanjing Financial Technology Research and Innovation Center, and the Bank of Jiangsu. Per the collaboration: “The four parties will work together to advance blockchain-based construction and application of innovative cross-border payment channels of the chain, and on this basis, promote the in-depth application of more financial products such as the conversion of renminbi and small currencies.” More importantly, as @LeonidasH explains, AsiaDB is creating a digital asset platform called Ocliven. This platform was constructed/tested in partnership with technology and financial experts like the Nanjing Institute of Digital Finance Industry, Ripple, and Shanghai Pudong Development Bank among others. Ripple's involvement with AsiaDB's Ocliven digital asset operation management system, sounds very similar to developments with SBI who will be leveraging XRP as part of a global cash management and domestic and international remittances for intra-group settlement of financial obligations amongst companies associated with SBI and those throughout Asia more broadly via FxCoin. FXCoin will develop an XRP based swap market to help increase XRP liquidity as well to hedge the price fluctuation risk associated with using XRP for contract-based business-to-business payments. Once you remove the potential risk associated with Fx rates, only then will institutional players come en masse. The Ocliven digital asset platform is, at its core, a swap marketplace to effectively attract and match different types of asset owners and fund owners, improve the traceability of underlying assets and transparency of asset management.
    6 points
  16. https://nypost.com/2021/09/18/young-crypto-industry-could-grow-if-sec-allows-it-to-thrive
    6 points
  17. Sorry this does not get to the point - very muddy questions and answers
    5 points
  18. "Concerning discussions with a third party whom Defendants understand received guidance from the SEC to analyze its digital asset under the framework set forth in Director William Hinman’s June 14, 2018 speech."
    5 points
  19. https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/09/breaking-exclusive-former-sec-chairman-clayton-directed-perkins-coie-draft-memo-giving-ethereum-bitcoin-unique-advantage-crypto-space-sec-sued-top-competitor-day-clayton/ Today we’ve uncovered a video that indicates former SEC Chairman Clayton was behind the SEC’s moves that created a favorable environment for two crypto companies, Ethereum and Bitcoin, while he was SEC Head. He dropped a lawsuit on their largest competitor Ripple on his last day in office. We know that Clayton made out handsomely as a result. In June we reported on the case of the century that involved the newly developed cryptocurrency industry, China, and some corrupt individuals in the US government who were trying to take advantage of select cryptocurrencies that they had an opportunity to cash in on. The big question on the Internet related to this story, is who made the call to give Ethereum an unfair advantage in the industry by labeling only Ethereum as a non-investment, allowing them to sidestep Investment-related regulations? We found the answer to this question and it is the same guy who shackled Ripple on his last day in office, Jay Clayton. In a video we found on YouTube Clayton is the one who directed Lowell Ness, a partner at Perkins Coie to draft the memo about Ethereum. This video indicates Jay Clayton was with attorney Lowell Ness at a meeting at venture firm Andreessen Horowitz on January 25, 2018, where the former SEC Chairman asked them for advice and suggestions for a “playbook” that would essentially become the SEC Guidelines that would give Ethereum a ‘free pass’. This meeting was confirmed on Clayton’s calendar. The Perkins Coie team then took their document to the SEC and presented their position in April to the joy of SEC leadership.
    5 points
  20. I just read through 100's of Discord messages looking for clarity on this and I found this from Flare team member Tom: "Let’s say you delegate to FTSO_xyz before the voting power lock and are eligible for rewards beginning Saturday. If you decide on Tuesday to change/undelegate from FTSO_xyz and delegate to FTSO_ABC instead, you are fixed to FTSO_xyz until the end of that rewards epoch. The system then switches to FTSO_ABC at the beginning of that next rewards epoch. Any rewards accumulated while “fixed” to FTSO_xyz, you keep. But you do not earn rewards with FTSO_ABC until the next rewards epoch begins. Switching delegation keeps you ‘fixed’ to the initial data provider you chose while you continue to earn any rewards with them for the remainder of the week. You are not eligible to earn rewards with the newly chosen provider until a new rewards epoch begins."
    5 points
  21. I was able to wrap songbird, select 2 validators from a list and delegate 50-50 to each delegator then sign with metemask. Simple, clean UI, user friendly, fast. I saw the ability to delegate XRP, XLM, doge, LTC, BCH for voting. Very confusing coin made incredibly simple on that one page. Good for the community to introduce these concepts slowly. I'm understanding the flare network ecosystem a lot better now and I have a good idea of what is to come. I have to say, this is awesome! I had to fight back the tears. This is one rock solid project. Wow. Better than tron, better than klaytn, better than tesoz. Even better than harmony. Jargoman approved
    5 points
  22. At last Gasparino is talking about the "conflict of interest". Code for "corruption" I don't see how SEC will be able to keep a lid on this story once it becomes about corruption, and by extension questions about how much the present chairman is a cover up guy and friend of the perpetrators? This is gathering into a meltdown moment for the SEC. Can they continue the case whilst the mass media is questioning their motives, and how much money the previous execs who met with Gensler on the eve of starting the case, made out of manufacturing this situation? It is going to be very interesting to watch how the SEC answer questions about "how much of this did you know" against we are the honest regulators and friends of the country. Can you be answering questions about your part in conspiracies and treason at the same time as being the honest brokers regulating the business community and weeding out corruption? How is this going to play out? Deaton has put the evidence together on a time line in a very straight forward way with videos etc. It is very little work for the hacks to write their stories from this script. Then there is the question of why Genslser has ignored the 20,000 hurt investors that petitioned him to root out the corruption? His silence, perhaps advised by his lawyers, now suddenly looks like collusion with Clayton and Hinman? Then there are the Chinese and Russian connection to Hinman and Clayton to discuss. And the scripted conversations between senator Warren and Gensler? meltdown.
    5 points
  23. The allegations combined with this new evidence is now becoming very serious criminal investigation. He openly brags that he wrote the memo that became Hinman's speech and Clayton commissioned his work months before the speech. So there we have it in sequence 2018 -2020 Lubin's firm going bust Clayton organising third party memo's to make ETH a non security Hester Pierce being kept out of the loop Hinman making the speech The investigation into Ripple begun Lubin raking in money by issuing useless fund raising tokens on Eth (an out of date tech) Gensler visiting Clayton Ripple being sued Clayton and Hinman going to high paid jobs connected with the Eth foundation Gensler being put in Clayton's chair telling us everything I am not sure if we have found evidence that Lubin's fortune from his revitalised company was used to oil the cogs of this conspiracy against society?
    5 points
  24. How to set up a TrustLine and receive airdrops with XummWallet and xrptoolkit? >> http://stedas.hr/spark-airdrop-for-xrp-holders.html There are many upcoming airdrop events for the XRP and Spark token holders 1) Spark airdrop (FLR) 🎁- for XRP holders 2) DaoFlare airdrop (DFLR) 🎁- for Spark (FLR) holders 3) Songbird (SGB) 🎁 4) ELS - @aesthetes_art 5) EVRS - @EvernodeXRPL 6) XGD - @coin_xgold plus many others... For a full list visit: https://xrpl.community/
    5 points
  25. Pretty much my understanding too. R3 and Ripple do not like each other much. But in the end all of this becomes one thing - the internet of Value and Ripple/XRP are set to the biggest item on that. If they were to take a 20% share of the business XRP would be in the hundreds, or thousands, but that is a decade away. On top of that you have all the other application - B2B, Remittances, Derivative tokenisation, Defi, FLR, NFTs, Gaming. So XRP is set to worth a lot in the not too distant future. The corruption at SEC has held XRP back for 3 years, but we have survived and we accumulated. Now we are about to take over huge areas of crypto
    5 points
  26. Thought that I would highlight the numbers here. Director of Infrastructure at Ripple (View all jobs) San Francisco, CA, United States Ripple’s mission is to enable payments every way, everywhere for everyone. We believe connecting traditional financial entities like banks, payment providers and corporations with emerging blockchain technologies and users is the path to an open, decentralized, and more inclusive financial future. This Internet of Value gives any internet-enabled person, application or device access to financial services that are transparent, fast, reliable, and cheap. Delivering this vision is a challenge of massive scale spanning $155 trillion in annual cross border fiat payments and the $1.5 trillion market of digital assets that has grown 10X in the last year. The Director of Infrastructure will play a critical role helping to advance Ripple's development and production infrastructure, leading our Operations Team to facilitate our DevOps process, including deployment, monitoring, instrumentation and overall infrastructure management.
    5 points
  27. Hope everyone is safe after yesterday's crash. Waiting to see where bitcoin finds its footing. Sub 3k ETH and sub $1 XRP looks pretty good to me.
    5 points
  28. This is looking more like a confirmation of an ABC correction than the beginning of a bear market. It is a bullish structure that is a pre for a moonshot to $4. Many would think it an ideal entry position
    5 points
  29. So senator Toomey has some questions for the record for Gensler. Some of the questions put Gensler in a tight spot. Pressure on the SEC's seemingly intentional ambiguity in the crypto space grows. Game over soon or just more of the same? Some of the questions are relevant for Ripple. https://cryptoking.org/crypto-senator-toomey-drives-sec-chair-gensler-into-a-corner/
    4 points
  30. Alex Dupre (of A-FTSO) just posted an initial update:
    4 points
  31. You can now check your rewards on flare metrics, just input your wallet address http://flaremetrics.io/check-reward
    4 points
  32. This is my best attempt at describing Flare/Songbird Time Series Oracle voting from the perspective of an ordinary person who doesn't care about all the details of what's going on at the network level, just what it means for them and their birds. Things still aren't crystal clear yet, so feel free to chime in if I've got something wrong and I'll update the post. Songbird has basically created a fun game where you can bet on who can provide the best price feeds to the network at no cost to yourself. The game runs on a weekly cycle running from 04:40 UTC (Greenwich Mean Time) on one Saturday to 04:40 UTC on the next Saturday. While it doesn't cost you anything to play, you do have to tell Songbird how many tokens you want to play with. You do that by wrapping your SGB, turning it into WSGB. If there's WSGB in your wallet, that tells Songbird that you want it to count toward your bet. You can always unwrap it to turn it back to SGB at anytime. So you've told Songbird how many tokens you want to bet with, now you have to tell it who to bet on. This is called delegating. You can bet on one or two data providers. If you choose two you can set how much WSGB you want to bet on each one by percent (50/50, 80/20, etc.). Once set, your delegations will be used for each weekly contest until you change them. Those are the two steps to play. You must have some WSGB in your wallet and you must have told Songbird how you want to bet. Your WSGB never leaves your wallet or gets locked up - it costs you nothing to play. Before each contest starts, Songbird records everybody's bets for the upcoming week. But here's the catch. If there was just one set time to bet each week, people could keep their tokens on exchanges trading all week and then move them over for the vote and send them back immediately afterwards. That doesn't help the network, so instead Songbird has a 48-hour window where the bets are recorded from 04:40 UTC on Thursday to 04:40 UTC on Saturday (just before the contest starts). The bets will be recorded at some random time in that 2-day window, but no one knows when. Whenever the bets get recorded, that's it, they're locked in for the upcoming week. At that point, any changes you make either to your WSGB balance or your delegations won't have an effect on the game until the next time bets are recorded in about a week. The game isn't like a horse race where there's one winner and a bunch of losers. Instead all the data providers will win something over the course of the week, the best ones will just win a little more. At the end of the week all the rewards that the data providers win will be divided up among the people who bet on them. You'll be able to claim your winnings once the week ends (they don't go into your wallet automatically), paid in WSGB. If you don't claim your winnings within 30 days, you will forfeit them and they'll go back into the rewards pool for the next contest. Songbird is set up to inflate the total SGB supply by 10% each year to run this game. If my math is right that means for this first year, they'll be paying out 28 Million WSGB in prizes each week. 20% of that goes to the data providers - if you want to keep the analogy going, you can think of that as the vig. The remaining 80% will go to all of us degenerate gamblers who played in the contest.
    4 points
  33. NightJanitor

    OMG must read

    Are the QFR's available? That's what I'd like to see. Patience... Patience...
    4 points
  34. Oh man, I just realized I could have said all that in three words: It's like staking. @BillyOckham helpfully added these simple tips: - So long as you claim within a month you won’t lose your reward. - Any change takes effect in the epoch following the lock-in. - If you claim, then wrap, every week you are getting the maximum compounding interest. - Weekly on any day Sunday through Wednesday is the optimal claim then wrap days. - You don’t need to repeat delegate once you have set your delegation, newly wrapped rewards will be auto-delegated in the proportions you set.
    4 points
  35. Can't believe this is all actually playing out like this. Clayton was running scared on cnbc today in my opinion. Something in me still believes Gensler is a better chess player than Clayton here. He accepted the role with a bird's eye view of the situation. The only aspect of this whole case that I can imagine Gensler would not have foreseen is the amount of evidence brought forth by the XRP army. I can also imagine Gensler seeing that ahead of time as a way to back Clayton and Hinman into a corner and to avoid all of the lawsuits that WOULD come if the SEC went back on ether's status. I think it's possible that the corruption, if exposed, gives cover for the potential of lawsuits over ethereum. I think Gensler and Warren could be playing a hand like that, and I think Warren's mention of the ethereum gas fees was the clue. This story below about spiraling (upwards) gas fees on ethereum was just dropped this afternoon as well. https://www.coindesk.com/business/2021/09/23/chaotic-time-magazine-nft-launch-sends-gas-fees-spiraling/ Seriously guys, I get more enthralled with this story by the day. It is incredible. And Ripple seem to be going on a bit of a PR blitz lately too.
    4 points
  36. I sort of guessed Lubin was a very bad business man. Criminals usually depend on corruption to make ends meet, which appears to be exactly how he fixed things? https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeffkauflin/2018/12/05/cryptopia-in-crisis-billionaire-joe-lubins-ethereum-experiment-is-a-mess-how-long-will-he-prop-it-up/?sh=6caf26682f0a
    4 points
  37. Also noticed you guys are now second on the list, congrats! Likely @brianwaldendelegating his fat stacks put you over the top.
    4 points
  38. AND SO IT BEGINS Monica Long is GM of RippleX - On a mission to enable the Internet of Value.
    4 points
  39. I’ve created a Tutorial on Wrapping and Unwrapping plus Delegating using our service. Lots of pictures too! https://www.ftso.com.au/how-to-guides/2021/09/22/wrap-unwrap-and-delegate-songbird-tokens.html
    4 points
  40. This is the second time I've seen you be "mad" at Gasparino. I get it - but I don't get it. Stop being impatient. Gasparino is an old-school journalist. He just sort of happened into this - like a week ago - and you're upset that he isn't as well versed in the nineteen layers of Dantean hell and corruption we're suffering, yet? And that he hasn't taken a "side?" He, probably, won't take a side - he's being careful - he's not out to Dan Rather himself and be a partisan. I think he's doing great work - and you don't see many other journalists doing that, lately - not big ones, with his cachet, who could just ignore it and play along and collect their paycheck and toe the party line - so, if your beef with him is that he's "old-school," well, thank God! Wish there were more like him! (But then he'd have to share the credit - so, maybe it'll work out, who knows, we'll see!) (On Gasparino/Deaton making for great TV, well... I have to agree. That combo would be must-see.)
    4 points
  41. IMHO it's very encouraging that Flare Finance's number of followers on Twitter is now over 75,000. Wow. And I sure hope they are stress testing the **** out of the network and services. This ain't no computer game release !!
    4 points
  42. WrathofKahneman

    FTSO matters

    Not sure the tweet embedded, but it's still early. FTSO - 3.5m BiFrost -3.1m FTSO AU -2.2M FTSO UK 1.7m What's impressive to me is that, as far as I can tell, there has been a lot of uptake with BiFrost, which probably put a lot of delegation in their FTSO. Meanwhile everyone on MM has to fumble along (disclaimer - MM irritates me ) Hope you are surviving & thriving in the blitz, @FTSO_AU. More to come!
    4 points
  43. I've spoken with Quincy, he is a very talented guy with a great personality. He will go far in any endeavor. I also feel a bit of a stalemate, wanting to stay in the US, and wanting to do serious crypto innovation. I have two key concepts that would apply to the derivatives market and the insurance markets. I have a few good people to work with, but I'm also not trying to break any securities laws (that is why I didn't participate in the ETH ICO). It's a real conundrum, can't wait forever, don't want to move away from friends & family.
    4 points
  44. 4 points
  45. I think most of us define a security strictly where there's an explicit arrangement between a business and investors, which is why most of us don't think XRP is a security. But I've recently realized that US law defines a security much more liberally. Basically any investment where investors pool money and the profits come primarily from the efforts of someone else, not the investors, is security. Individual coins can make the case that they're not securities, but most of what's happening in DeFi, for example, are securities under US law. People want securities, they want to be able to put their money into something and sit back and watch it grow over time. Satoshi Nakamoto set out to make a trustless currency but that's evolved into a low-trust financial system. Traditional finance is a high-trust system and all of our regulations are designed around that. Crypto works because by removing the trust, it removes all the other inefficiencies that come along with it. You can't just plug crypto into the current regulations. I think the only reasonable thing to do is to accept that crypto is different and come up with regulations that work with it so we can all benefit from it. Here's a few thoughts of mine on how it might work out: 1) Governments need to accept that there will always be unregulated areas of the cryptoverse. Unless they want to shut down people's internet access, people are going to use crypto. I think governments need to design regulations in ways that make people want to use regulated crypto and don't feel burdened by the regulations. 2) Regulated crypto services need to be registered with their governments so that the public has access to them if there's a problem. 3) Regulated crypto services will be required to be insured/bonded against hacks and theft. Ideally, the insurer would reimburse customers quickly and then handle the legal stuff itself. This would make it easier on the courts because instead of having thousands of people filing cases when somebody does a rug pull, it'll just be an insurance company suing the developers. 4) Regulated crypto services will only take deposits from and allow withdrawals to KYC'd wallets. I don't really like it but I think we've gotta give governments this one. This can be with services like GlobalID so you don't have to go through KYC with every single crypto service you use - you just have to setup your identity and attach your wallets to it. My hope is that since blockchains leave a record of transactions, this would be enough to make governments happy and they won't require the other reporting that banks have to do. Crypto services will never be required to freeze funds - the fact that all their movements are public should be enough for the government. 5) There needs to be a better way to tax crypto. Taxing it like stocks is way too difficult for ordinary people to keep track of, and DeFi is only becoming more complicated. I don't know if the answer is to only pay taxes when funds leave the crypto ecosystem, or take a yearly snapshot and you're taxed on your gains from the previous year, or what? But I don't think governments are going to let us get away with not paying taxes, the next best thing is to make it simple and easy. I think that's it. The government gets identity and taxes, the people get some protection, and crypto mostly gets to go on being crypto. The low burdens will hopefully be enough incentive for developers to go the regulated route. What do you think?
    4 points
  46. The Self Enriching Criminals keep digging their own graves ever deeper, they must be on a Kamikaze mission. If they don't settle soon by giving into whatever Ripple wants, then even more evidence may come to light and bury both the SEC and some of its officials, along with any of the string pullers, even deeper.
    4 points
  47. FTSO_AU

    FTSO matters

    Here’s a preview of the wrap/unwrap dialog box and the delegation steps in our dashboard. We kept them as separate processes, from a workflow perspective - once wrapped you may not need to unwrap or do anymore wrapping, however you may want to fiddle with your delegation % … hopefully leaving some with us. 😉 (Perhaps we should hard-code that) 😂
    4 points
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