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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/10/2016 in all areas

  1. They can up their game even more if they have Margot Robbie in a bubble bath explaining how Ripple & XRP work. ?... Video would go viral in seconds...
    5 points
  2. nice videos, added them to Bithomp, so platform users will see it too! https://bithomp.com/learn hm.. thinking to add the last video with Margot Robbie too, will it make sense in "learn more" section ..?
    3 points
  3. I have felt that there are more use cases for Ripple then just the FX Transfer and Settlement Use case. Bank transfer fees just within the US are ridiculous -- especially at the retail level (bank wires - really) and most of the traditional low cost options like ACH are multiday affairs to clear and you can only pay major vendors (for the most part) with ACH. At some point, the US domestic bank fee stranglehold will be broken by smaller, more nimble banks -- which will cause a "crisis of fees" for the "too-big-to-fail" US Banks. That's my hope anyway.
    2 points
  4. Now it shows count of exchanges and count of payments. I can show volumes of exchanges and payments too. But that will include just the volumes from ripple, not from exchanges like Poloniex etc. Thinking to add: Issue values, Capitalization for Bitstamp USD/BTC, XRP distribution and to improve interface, so users would actually chose their own period for the data, or to zoom in/out. But as it a lot of data, I need to store/cache it locally in my DB, to make it build quicker takes time, I'll back to it after finishing another product of Bithomp.
    2 points
  5. JoelKatz

    The Fate of Fees

    Yeah, that's a great insight. You have protocols like BGP that manage to day-to-day coordination. You have interest groups and authorities that manage the longer term evolution.
    1 point
  6. One of these about XRP would be nice
    1 point
  7. Duke67

    New Ripple Marketing Videos

    Cracks are too large and it's too much of them. Bitcoin has shown us the path and Ripple made a real product based on that vision. Now there is a huge chance for nimble banks at the market and it's up to the big ones if they want to adapt or they will slowly die. No lobbying is going to help them now. Too late to hold the fintech back.
    1 point
  8. xebit

    New Ripple Marketing Videos

    It's a breath of fresh air to see Ripple release polished promotional advertising after years of what seemed like only testing and partnership news. Ripple is entering the next stage. Was a long wait.
    1 point
  9. Hodor

    New Ripple Marketing Videos

    Yes - this is a point that the larger ones will fight with all their lobbying power, but you can see cracks in the foundation already!
    1 point
  10. Duke67

    New Ripple Marketing Videos

    Excellent videos - all 4 of them incl. Margot :-) It really makes you feel like "why may bank does not have anything like that"? Finally it seems like Ripple marketing is warming up. This is the best fintech "with compliance" so far, what are the banks waiting for? Santa, or what?
    1 point
  11. JoelKatz

    The Fate of Fees

    I'm not exactly sure what the best way will turn out to be. Here's my best guess: 1) A few groups will emerge who are willing to publish lists of validators. They'll likely confirm the identity of the validator operator, the jurisdiction they're in, the type of organization they are (individual, government, company). They can also report the validator's policy claims -- for example, if they claim they will accept all transactions on a non-discriminatory basis, run unmodified versions of rippled, provide 30 days notice if they will cease operations if possible, and so on. 2) Server operators will configure a list of publishers and a policy. The policy will combine the publishers and also enforce whatever the operator wants. For example, they may not want too many validators in the same jurisdiction. They may not want any validators that won't promise to treat transactions in a non-discriminatory way. And so on. You can also rate limit how fast a publisher can change its entries, to protect against a publisher who goes rogue. 3) If the system is in danger of breaking in some way, humans should detect this long before it happens. That may mean changing publishers, blacklisting validators proven to misbehave, and so on. 4) If we ever have too many validators (more than 1,000 or so) we should probably prune the list. Possibly eliminating the slowest validators from the most crowded jurisdictions or something like that. 5) To start a new validator, you would configure your machine and apply to the most popular publishers. In the meantime, you could try to convince people to add you manually. If you perform well, people should add you. The advantage of this over mining (beyond the energy savings) is that it's clear how you manage the system to make it very resistant to centralization and respond to any misbehaving participants. You aren't beholden to whoever spends the most money on hashing power. The disadvantage is that you do have to manage it and doing that in a decentralized way is non-trivial. While mining has proven itself reliable, it has not proven itself resistant to centralization. While proof of stake in a native token can work for networks where the primary purpose of the network is to preserve the value and utility of the native token, it doesn't properly align incentives for a network whose primary purpose is something other than that. You can pretty much use any of these schemes for any system and it will work well enough, with just one exception: You can't use anything other than consensus for something with cross-currency payments and built in order books without really nasty consequences. Otherwise, while there are sub-optimal choices, you can get pretty much any of them to work for any use case.
    1 point
  12. Malloy

    New Ripple Marketing Videos

    Part of the 3 clips that came out today...best videos promo I've seen so far
    1 point
  13. This right here isn't what will make XRP go to the moon, however, it's my favorite. And the funny thing is I don't even need it for cross border payment as of now which is pretty much the whole idea behind this technology. Growing up with friends and family dealing with not having the correct amount of cash or not being able to send money from bank to bank and needing to drive to an ATM just to take out money to put it back in someone elses bank account. This causes spending money on gas and going out in the snow and etc that is so inefficient and sometimes you just never get paid back. Just a couple of examples that has had me constantly thinking of this killer app for decades now is paying a dinner bill, going to the drive thru with friends tonight when its freezing out or fantasy sports league or just betting on sports or being right or wrong putting your money where your mouth is lol Ive stopped carrying cash for over 9 years now.
    1 point
  14. RobertHarpool

    Fed Paper on DLT

    I found some mentions of Ethereum...(pg 29 Section 6.1).... and page 30....yada yada fork yada yada unstable yada yada.... Otherwise, they're not pointing any fingers or naming any names that I can tell.
    1 point
  15. http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/money-and-banking/singapore-monetary-authority-fintech-chief/article9414001.ece
    1 point
  16. JoelKatz

    The Fate of Fees

    There are two main problems with this: 1) The whole point of the consensus design is that you don't need agreement on who the validators are. But this scheme couldn't work without agreement on who the validators are. 2) Security would be weakened by this scheme as now validators have an incentive to sabotage each other rather than an incentive to cooperate. But also, it's not needed. Running a validator is no more expensive than running a Bitcoin full node. Those don't seem to need to be incentivized.
    1 point
  17. I actually like Augur, and adopted some of their business methods into KarmaCoverage. Not sure I buy the "prediction market" idea. What they are doing is simply binary options. 2nd binary option link
    1 point
  18. If you like.. http://gtgox.com/xrp配布の内訳/
    1 point
  19. mocozworld asked "Is this Ripple?" And Kitao answered "It's Ripple".
    1 point
  20. The way Multi-Signing currently works in the Ripple Consensus Ledger, you define a weight for each signer when you set up the signer list, and you set up a target "threshold" for the list. When you look at a multi-signature, you add up the weights of all the signers in it, and if they equal or exceed the threshold, then the multi-signature is enough to authorize the transaction. That gives you much more flexibility than some fixed rule like, "you need a majority of signatures." Signer weights are unsigned 16-bit integers, so you can use values 1 through 65535. The threshold is an unsigned int in the range (1, sum of signer weights) inclusive. FUN FACT: With the current values for max signers (8) and max weight (2^16 - 1), the current de facto maximum threshold is 524280. Example: If you want to do, "Monica can sign for me, as long as either Warren or Asheesh approve, but Warren and Asheesh can't sign without Monica," then you could set your signer list as follows: Members: - Monica (Weight: 2) - Warren (Weight: 1) - Asheesh (Weight: 1) Threshold: 3 So Monica + Warren = 2+1 >= 3. Monica + Asheesh is the same, but Asheesh + Warren (1+1 < 3) so Asheesh and Warren can't sign for you unless Monica also does. That's multi-signature weights for you. There are still some cases that you can't do, but it's way more flexible than simple "M-of-N" signing. And I'm not even going into the details that David was discussing about other features like how Ripple's multi-sign is designed so that members can change their keys independently. (But that's another cool feature.)
    1 point
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